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Tales of Mystery and Imagination

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Extraordinary artwork recreates three classic Poe tales.


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Extraordinary artwork recreates three classic Poe tales.

30 review for Tales of Mystery and Imagination

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mohammed Arabey

    It's unfair to just burying Poe in the "Horror" tomb, with a Raven & a Black Cat.. Reading this volume I really see how HUGE his imagination was, how it was ahead of his times. From traveling over the ocean by a air transportation... or to the moon.. Or inventing the first Detective story ever.. Or his delving into the matter, death, soul, mind and even God and free well by hypothesis. Or of course, the delving into the man's Conscience, guilt and self-destruction.. There's even kind of Romance, F It's unfair to just burying Poe in the "Horror" tomb, with a Raven & a Black Cat.. Reading this volume I really see how HUGE his imagination was, how it was ahead of his times. From traveling over the ocean by a air transportation... or to the moon.. Or inventing the first Detective story ever.. Or his delving into the matter, death, soul, mind and even God and free well by hypothesis. Or of course, the delving into the man's Conscience, guilt and self-destruction.. There's even kind of Romance, Fantasy, adventure, treasure hunt, code breaking, satire... He inspired Fyodor Dostoyevsky and Arthur Conan Doyle with crime novels, And inspired Jules Verne ,then H G Wells and even recently Andy Weir with his science fiction stories, And so more... just by his wild imagination.. So the five stars here are for his originality and innovations in stories.. Which is not just little Horror Stories.. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Personal Note: ---------- In order to enjoy his stories, I read first the Arabic -complete, unbridged- translation of it... then reviewing and fast readin it in its original forum, since Poe use a bit hard language for me and he's got a way in 'digression' sometimes and complex sentences. So I skipped few stories here till I have the translation of it-and even enjoyed some stories that aren't in this edition-, so I'll be back to this book again soon. Mohammed Arabey From 20 April 2017 To 6 May 2017

  2. 5 out of 5

    A. Dawes

    This will be another ongoing review, as I've been doing with collections and anthologies. Poe has always mesmerised me in terms of his influence on writers and the short story genre at large; his poetry is also both haunting and relatively accessible. This collection was given to me in hardback, 31 years ago. Its pages are now yellow and aged, but the contents within are better than I remember. If you're patient with Poe, I think you'll find he's very rewarding in return. If you rush through and This will be another ongoing review, as I've been doing with collections and anthologies. Poe has always mesmerised me in terms of his influence on writers and the short story genre at large; his poetry is also both haunting and relatively accessible. This collection was given to me in hardback, 31 years ago. Its pages are now yellow and aged, but the contents within are better than I remember. If you're patient with Poe, I think you'll find he's very rewarding in return. If you rush through and don't enjoy the rhythm of the prose, I'd imagine he'd be tiresome. He's one of those writers to be savoured when you have the time rather than a page turning entertainment. William Wilson 5* William Wilson" is all about 'the double'. Even the eponymous title is a pun of sorts: Will-I-am, and Wil-son. Through a doppelganger haunting William, Poe explores the concept of sanity. An interesting story with long sentences but little specific imagery. Psychologically chilling. The Gold-Bug 3* A little more dated, involving a bug bite (and potential madness) and a cryptogram. Not a storyline that did much for me personally. The Fall of the House of Usher 5* A classic Poe story. The unnamed narrator visits the crumbling gothic mansion of his friend Usher to learn of Usher's sister's death. But not all is as seems. This story is the very opposite of William Wilson in terms of style. Rather than being devoid of imagery, Poe illustrates his stylistic variation and prowess with a story of sensory imagery overload. Poe manages this detailed gothic prose to build on an especially macabre mood and atmosphere. The language aesthetics here are as powerful as the story. A gothic horror masterpiece. The Masque of Red Death 5* Another gothic fantasy. Holed up in an aristocratic castle trying to avoid 'the Red Death'- basically the plague; a masquerade ball takes a catastrophic turn. A masked guest in blue is the Red Death personified. And although deadly, he is both more and less than he seems. Foreboding atmosphere throughout. A strong tale. The Cask of Amontillado 4.5* Like most of Poe's stories, this haunted me long after I finished it. What atmosphere could be more chilling than a man murdering another for revenge at Carnivale time in a unnamed part of Italy? The protagonist, Montresor, somehow holds Fortunato accountable for his own decline in fortunes. Fortunato (obviously relating to fortune) is a happy, respected and an admired member of society, who has risen through the ranks, possibly with the aid of The Freemasons. He is everything Montresor once was, and he has apparently made a few derogatory comments about Montresor, although whether this is the reason for his murder, or whether the reason is an envy bordering on lunacy, is questionable. Another excellent dark story. A Descent into the Maelstrom 3* An old-fashioned tale of a maelstrom whirlpool survivor. Only Poe takes the wonders and beauty of the vortex further. Not my personal favourite, but I'd think a few sci-fi fans would love it. The Pit and the Pendulum 4* As a reader who enjoys dark fiction, fantasy and historical fiction, this imaginative tale of torture during the Spanish Inquisition really intrigued me. The strong aural imagery throughout takes us almost into the realm of the ghostly too. I feel as though this story had a great influence on gothic horror tales in general. While not as complicated as some other stories here, it's still a captivating narrative. The Purloined Letter 3.5* A forerunner for short detective fiction. A letter has been stolen and there appears blackmail (and more) at hand. There are far better detective stories out there, but this is an interesting look at an early exponent of the genre. Metzengerstein 4* A gothic tale on a hyperbolic scale. This one is devoid of subtlety and is rather heavy handed with regards to both the gothic tropes along with its overt symbolism. In this tale, Frederick, the sole living member of the Metzengerstein family line, has a long standing vendetta with the Berlifitzing clan. When a fire destroys the Berlifitzing patriarch, Frederick is suspected. Frederick, however, is obsessed with a wild horse, which has eerily gone unobserved. Metzengerstein's own home is then set alight, and with an ironic justice, the wild horse, with Frederick on it, charges into the flames. A clever case of guilt personified -or guilt hippofied... The Murders in the Rue Morgue 3.5* Murders, balconies, and that good ol'orangutan... Detective Dupin from The Purloined Letter is back again. Once again this mystery story is not nearly as sharp as the detective stories of today. In fact, this story is laughable. I still liked it though, as I don't think I'll ever read another mystery story involving a Bornean great ape. The Tell-tale Heart 5* One of the most famous of Poe's stories, so it doesn't require any of my clumsy commentary. Lovely way to end the collection. This collection is worth it. It chiefly contains the best of Poe with a range of styles on display, and those few tales that aren't his best are still incredibly interesting in terms of the evolution of the short story. When on song, Poe is a gothic master, and the chilling psychology behind most of these haunting tales adds extra layers to the intrigue and uncertainty, and these layers exemplify Poe's greatest works.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Tales of Mystery and Imagination, Edgar Allan Poe تاریخ نخستین خوانش: اول دسامبر سال 1993 میلادی عنوان: ماجراهای شگفت انگیز؛ نویسنده: ادگار آلن پو؛ با مقدمه: شارل بودلر؛ مترجم: پرویز شهدی؛ تهران، پانوس، 1371، در 400 ص، چاپ دیگر: تهران، فرهنگ جاوید، 1390، در 380 ص؛ شابک: 9786009158591؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان امریکایی - قرن 19 م کارهای پو، همه دلفریب هستند. نخست انگار میکنید گردبادی در راه است، آنگاه تنها نسیمی بر شما میوزد. باور میکنید مسئله جدی ست، سپس درمییابید ماجرا بر روی پایگاه خیال آرمیده Tales of Mystery and Imagination, Edgar Allan Poe تاریخ نخستین خوانش: اول دسامبر سال 1993 میلادی عنوان: ماجراهای شگفت انگیز؛ نویسنده: ادگار آلن پو؛ با مقدمه: شارل بودلر؛ مترجم: پرویز شهدی؛ تهران، پانوس، 1371، در 400 ص، چاپ دیگر: تهران، فرهنگ جاوید، 1390، در 380 ص؛ شابک: 9786009158591؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان امریکایی - قرن 19 م کارهای پو، همه دلفریب هستند. نخست انگار میکنید گردبادی در راه است، آنگاه تنها نسیمی بر شما میوزد. باور میکنید مسئله جدی ست، سپس درمییابید ماجرا بر روی پایگاه خیال آرمیده است. ادگار آلن پو، پدر رمانهای پلیسی بوده است. پو خوانشگر را وادار می‌کند تا در چشم وحشت و مرگ به دقت نگاه بنگرد. فهرست: چند کلمه به عنوان توضیح؛ ادگار آلن پو و آثارش؛ جنایتهای دوگانه در کوچه مورگ؛ نامه ی سرقت شده؛ سوسک طلایی؛ اخبار دروغین درباره ی بالون؛ ماجرای بیمانند شخصی به نام هانس فال؛ دستنویس پیدا شده در یک بطری؛ سقوط در گرداب مالستروم؛ حقیقت قضیه ی آقای والدمار؛ تجلیات خواب مغناطیسی؛ خاطرات آقای اوگوست بدلو؛ مورلا؛ لی جیا؛ متزن گوشتاین؛ گاهشمار زندگی و آثار نویسنده. ا. شربیانی

  4. 5 out of 5

    Warwick

    I remember visiting the Edgar Allan Poe museum the last time I was in Richmond, Virginia. At the time I don't think I had read any of his work, except perhaps The Raven. The museum was a creepy place, as you might imagine, with a lot of dark wood and eerie pictures and a strange garden that seemed to be in permanent shadow. It was a strange place and he was a strange man – a hard writer to pin down: distinctly American, but hugely influential in European letters; not technically a very brilliant I remember visiting the Edgar Allan Poe museum the last time I was in Richmond, Virginia. At the time I don't think I had read any of his work, except perhaps The Raven. The museum was a creepy place, as you might imagine, with a lot of dark wood and eerie pictures and a strange garden that seemed to be in permanent shadow. It was a strange place and he was a strange man – a hard writer to pin down: distinctly American, but hugely influential in European letters; not technically a very brilliant writer, and yet the founder of half a dozen new literary genres. Reading him feels, to me, like an act of almost shameful self-indulgence; rich but sickly; you feel you need a brisk walk afterwards. His weird stories mark a bridge between the Gothic and the new movements of symbolism and decadence and, later, the genres that would become known as horror and science fiction. He also invented the modern detective story. I think of him as one of those writers that translates easily. In the same way, Tolstoy is venerated by non-Russians while native speakers find his prose mediocre. French speakers often say something similar about Victor Hugo. And the French were, it must be said, quite obsessed with ‘Edgar Poe’, particularly after his works were translated by Baudelaire. Quelque chose de monomanique was the shrewd judgement of the Goncourts. Hard to argue with that. The predominant theme is death, but death elevated to a supernatural vividness and importance. The archetypal image of his works, for me, is the image of the young, beautiful, dead woman. This trope features heavily in ‘Morella’, ‘Berenice’, ‘The Fall of the House of Usher’, ‘Ligeia’ – and indeed in Poe's own life, because he married his thirteen-year-old cousin and she went on to die of tuberculosis when she was twenty-four. The death clearly left a lasting imprint on him. So, yes: thanatophilia. I'm rolling out the long words. But it's true. Have a look at how he chooses to end ‘The Masque of the Red Death’, for instance: And now was acknowledged the presence of the Red Death. He had come like a thief in the night. And one by one dropped the revellers in the blood-bedewed halls of their revel, and died each in the despairing posture of his fall. And the life of the ebony clock went out with that of the last of the gay. And the flames of the tripods expired. And Darkness and Decay and the Red Death held illimitable dominion over all. Sleep tight, kids! Another story ends: ‘the grave was still a home, and the corrosive hours, co-mates.’ Another ends: ‘there lay a nearly liquid mass of loathsome—of detestable putridity.’ Another ends – well you get the idea. Poe's prose is melodramatic and rococo and makes full use of Grand Exclamations! And italicised phrases of dread! Oh the Horror and the Agony! And nothing but the drear grave and the worm for evermore! And so forth. But he is also imaginative and, sometimes, positively economical, setting the scene brilliantly in just a few short sentences and creating an atmosphere all his own (what Allen Ginsberg called his ‘demonic dreaminess’). His vocabulary, steeped as it is in the high-flown tradition of dark romanticism, was a constant delight to me, built of ornate items like sulphureous, pulsation, exergue, faucial, chasmal, cachinnatory, asphyctic and many more goodies besides. Jorge Luis Borges said that Poe's writings as a whole constitute a work of genius, although each individual piece is flawed. This is a very appealing assessment. He is an important writer, and often a very fascinating and enjoyable one – but that said, I don't really feel the desire to spend all that much time in his company. However, make sure you get a version with Harry Clarke's angular, Beardsley-esque illustrations. They are superlative.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dolors

    "An artist is usually a damned liar, but his art, if it be art, will tell you the truth of his day." D.H. Lawrence. Burying people alive, ghosts, macabre deaths of usually delicate and young women, dark magic, effects of inebriation and hallucination, torture, whirlpools sucking people out of their time, fatal plagues, abnormal psychological states, obsessional behaviors... William Blake in prose. If D.H. Lawrence was any close to right about his predicament I wouldn't have liked to be in Mr.Poe' "An artist is usually a damned liar, but his art, if it be art, will tell you the truth of his day." D.H. Lawrence. Burying people alive, ghosts, macabre deaths of usually delicate and young women, dark magic, effects of inebriation and hallucination, torture, whirlpools sucking people out of their time, fatal plagues, abnormal psychological states, obsessional behaviors... William Blake in prose. If D.H. Lawrence was any close to right about his predicament I wouldn't have liked to be in Mr.Poe's skin, such horrors! That Poe lead a tormented and dysfunctional life is no secret. Haunted by the death of his mother when he was barely a toddler and later by the long illness and ultimate death of the love of his life(his cousin Virginia)whom he married when she was only thirteen, Poe struggled to keep afloat between feelings of abandonment and loss and his growing ill-health and addictions which eventually killed him in mysterious circumstances at the age of 40. Whether this gloomy life served him as inspiration or he released his pain into his work, the extremeness of his imaginative creations managed to capture attention, if not acceptance. The sickness-the nausea- The pitiless pain- Have ceased, with the fever That maddened my brain- With the fever called "Living" That burned in my brain. Considered the father of the short story, Poe manages to control the soul of the reader, nothing intervenes or distracts once you are engulfed in one of his curious and terrifying tales, you feel pulled down by an inexplicable and exotic sort of nostalgia which catches at your breath and prevents you from stopping to read. But make no mistake, Poe plays with you, giving you hope in a futile attempt to search for the truth and offer a plausible explanation for the unaccountable, even though you know deep inside that the end will be doomed from the start. His literary quality is irrefutable, he borrows from the European Gothic tradition and adds elements of detective stories, creating a new register which seeks for the horrendous truth, for the paincuts into your soul, although sometimes a rare kind of beauty oozes from the text, whether conscious or unconsciously I can't say: Then silence, stillness, and night were the universe But mainly, Poe appears as a ruthless, crude and pessimistic voice who wants to put order amid the chaos, who wants to explain the inexplicable to elevate the name of the artist; offering an alternative to the newly born optimism, complacency and materialism of his age, and asking for nothing in return. He didn't seek for approval and often had to endure rebuke, few of his contemporaries valued his work at the time and being considered an oddball he was banned from society (or he excluded himself willingly). It is through the anguish and torment expressed in his poems and short stories that it is plausible to imagine his existence rather miserable and that he suffered from a precariously balanced state of mind. But then, once again, I ask myself the same question which always arises when I try to link the real life of a writer with his work, was it his eccentricity that made his works so special? Were they the product of a genius or a deranged mind ? Or both? The truth is, I am heartily sick of this life, and of the nineteenth century in general. I am convinced that everything is going wrong. Besides, I am anxious to know who will be President in 2045. As soon, therefore, as I shave and swallow a cup of coffee, I shall step over to Ponnonner's and get embalmed for a couple of hundred years. In any case, although his haunted mind offered no respite, Poe's lucid writing managed to push the scales of reality and redefine the artistic world of beauty and lyricism towards a new daring approach where the probability of terror and darkness prevailed and where the motto could be summed up as to deny what is, and explain what is not . As it usual happens in real life, neither black nor white, just a blurred smudge of indistinct grey.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Foad

    ادگار آلن پو در ایران بیشتر به واسطۀ چهار پنج تا از داستان های خیلی معروفش (گربۀ سیاه، نقاب مرگ سرخ، قلب رازگو، سقوط خاندان آشر و...) شناخته میشه. این کتاب مجموعه ای از داستان های کمتر شناخته شدۀ پو در ایرانه. هر چند بعضی از داستان های این مجموعه هم جزء داستان های کلیدی پو هستن. مثل دو داستان اول (جنایت در کوی غسّالخانه، و نامۀ گمشده) که کارآگاه آگوست دوپن رو برای اولین بار معرفی می کنن. کارآگاهی که بعدها منبع الهام برای خلق کارآگاه های دیگه، مثل شرلوک هولمز، پوآرو شد. جدای از این دو داستان، چند ادگار آلن پو در ایران بیشتر به واسطۀ چهار پنج تا از داستان های خیلی معروفش (گربۀ سیاه، نقاب مرگ سرخ، قلب رازگو، سقوط خاندان آشر و...) شناخته میشه. این کتاب مجموعه ای از داستان های کمتر شناخته شدۀ پو در ایرانه. هر چند بعضی از داستان های این مجموعه هم جزء داستان های کلیدی پو هستن. مثل دو داستان اول (جنایت در کوی غسّالخانه، و نامۀ گمشده) که کارآگاه آگوست دوپن رو برای اولین بار معرفی می کنن. کارآگاهی که بعدها منبع الهام برای خلق کارآگاه های دیگه، مثل شرلوک هولمز، پوآرو شد. جدای از این دو داستان، چند داستان خیلی خوب دیگه هم توی این مجموعه بود، به طور خاص، سوسک طلایی، حقیقت قضیۀ آقای والدمار و لیجیا جزء داستان های خوب این کتاب بودن. باقی داستان ها در حدّ قابل قبول بودن، بعضی هاشون کم و بیش تکرار ایده های داستان های دیگۀ پو بودن (مثل متزن گرشتاین، که عناصری از گربۀ سیاه داشت).

  7. 4 out of 5

    Luís C.

    In 1849 Baudelaire published in France the Tales of the Grotesque and the Arabesque, of Allan Poe, with the title Extraordinary Stories, which reached a great success.It is a very elaborate set of texts - such as The Fall of the House of Usher, The Barrel of Amontillado, The Black Cat, The Crimes of Morgue Street, among others - in which, with extreme skill, Poe focuses on the fantastic and the supernatural with detailed descriptions, leading the reader to a nocturnal world, enigmatic, neurotic In 1849 Baudelaire published in France the Tales of the Grotesque and the Arabesque, of Allan Poe, with the title Extraordinary Stories, which reached a great success.It is a very elaborate set of texts - such as The Fall of the House of Usher, The Barrel of Amontillado, The Black Cat, The Crimes of Morgue Street, among others - in which, with extreme skill, Poe focuses on the fantastic and the supernatural with detailed descriptions, leading the reader to a nocturnal world, enigmatic, neurotic and terrifying.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Magrat Ajostiernos

    Me guardo unos poquitos cuentos para el Halloween del año que viene.... Me parece la lectura perfecta para esas fechas aunque no es recomendable leer tantos cuentos de Poe muy seguidos para no saturar. Distanciándolos se disfrutan y aprecian mucho más, hay alguno que tardaré en olvidar, es un autor que me ha sorprendido mucho.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Percival Cyber

    Thank God it's Friday . . . the 13th!? There's nothing creepier than reading an Edgar Allan Poe classic on this day. Prepare the weak hearted, however, for a single Friday might not be enough to survive Mr. Poe's "Tales of Mystery and Imagination". With its collection of 24 short stories, get ready to explore the bizarre, the mystic, the macabre, the dark motives, and the dreadful predicaments of his disturbed characters. TOP PICKS (5 stars): -The Gold-Bug Poe's most widely read short story during h Thank God it's Friday . . . the 13th!? There's nothing creepier than reading an Edgar Allan Poe classic on this day. Prepare the weak hearted, however, for a single Friday might not be enough to survive Mr. Poe's "Tales of Mystery and Imagination". With its collection of 24 short stories, get ready to explore the bizarre, the mystic, the macabre, the dark motives, and the dreadful predicaments of his disturbed characters. TOP PICKS (5 stars): -The Gold-Bug Poe's most widely read short story during his lifetime. It popularized cryptography and its usage in stories. This is also one of his few that are not under the horror genre, proving that Poe is a master writer in other genres aside from what he is famous for. -The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar A powerful macabre story. I’m wondering if any hypnotists have attempted it before. If you want to know what I’m talking about, you know what to do. -The Black Cat I’m guessing this could be the first story that popularized the myth of the bad luck a black cat brings. We have a lot of black cats before and contrary to the belief, it actually brought us relief for they were the ones who ate (and fought) the similarly large rats lurking in our ancient house. So great show every day. Anyway, this is a story about the adverse effects of alcoholism (Poe hates it so much) and how it affected the protagonist and his family. Once I also heard wailings in our present house, it has a striking resemblance to the ones described in the story, and upon investigation I found out it was just our cats having—never mind. -The Masque of the Red Death Who would have thought this story is about tuberculosis (probably)? My first literary encounter with gothic horror. Many times I get bored with the subgenre but here Poe pulls it off really well. I like the color schemes and of course, the final reveal. -The Cask of Amontillado His first story that I read. We discussed this ominous account in the 9th grade (only one of the few instances where I was excited in coming to class) and revisited in the 11th grade. Yet I still cannot say that I fully grasped the mysteries surrounding the story. I remember our Creative Writing educator, she made us notice the extensive use of irony all throughout: Fortunato’s unfortunate fate, a freemason’s death involving being entombed alive, etc. I love how Montressor’s motives were not explained. It is up to us readers to theorize why he did it. It could be that answering the question ourselves might reveal the reasons of our inner hatred and desire to “finish” someone in the future. At least that’s my take. -The Imp of the Perverse The phrase I’ve been looking for for a long time. Perfectly captures a taboo everyone of us are guilty of possessing. -The Oval Portrait -The Tell-Tale Heart Another interesting murder confession. “. . . but why will you say that I am mad?” (then goes on blustering his insanity) Though I shamefully admit that at times I have the same dissonance with the unnamed narrator. “. . . now, I say, there came to my ears a low, dull, quick sound, such as a watch makes when enveloped in cotton.” I adore Poe’s sharp attention to detail and comparisons. I heard this story more than I read it. “Chilling Tales for Dark Nights”, a YouTube channel dedicated to anything horror, has an excellent audio drama about the story. Try checking it out. Unlike “The Cask of Amontillado” the protagonist’s motive was mentioned, even a bit symbolically: “I think it was his eye! yes, it was this!” Like “The Black Cat”, this story’s theme touches on guilt and how it makes us divulge the evil deed we systematically planned and promised to be kept as a secret. -Berenice If I'm being honest, I was a bit disappointed that the book did not include one of the best poems ever created: “The Raven”. There are some stories that are crazy long and I didn't get. That is the reason why this book is still scheduled in my list to be re-read and again the third time for my top picks. Expect review updates soon!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kyriakos Sorokkou

    Tales of Mystery & Imagination Since I've written mini reviews for each of the stories I will have them here slightly edited along with an overall rating and review for the collection as a whole. 1) The Gold Bug A treasure hunt story involving cryptography, directions, clues, skulls, and a lot of digging. It felt like watching Dora the Little Explorer but in a much darker atmosphere. 4 main characters, the narrator, his friend Mr Legrand, Legrand's dog and Legrand's servant, a nigger, yes anoth Tales of Mystery & Imagination Since I've written mini reviews for each of the stories I will have them here slightly edited along with an overall rating and review for the collection as a whole. 1) The Gold Bug A treasure hunt story involving cryptography, directions, clues, skulls, and a lot of digging. It felt like watching Dora the Little Explorer but in a much darker atmosphere. 4 main characters, the narrator, his friend Mr Legrand, Legrand's dog and Legrand's servant, a nigger, yes another story that has racist remarks. Anyway this was a 3.5 stars story nothing more than a treasure hunt. But I've enjoyed it more than others. 2) The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar A practitioner of mesmerism (a precursor of hypnosis) tries through the medium of hypnosis/mesmerism to revive a recently deceased person. A macabre little tale worthy of 3 stars. Didn't blew my mind though. 3) MS. Found in a Bottle A story about a man that scrambles aboard a gigantic ship manned by elderly crewmen who are unable to see him (possibly a ghost ship). A sea tale that ends abruptly and with a sense of doom. 3 stars because I needed more, something that Mr. Poe rarely does. 4) A Descent into the Mælström At the summit of a mountain climb in Lofoten (mentioned in Kavvadias Ο Πιλότος Νάγκελ), in Norway, an old Norwegian is telling the story of his near escape from a massive whirlpool called Mælström. Interesting story but there's no actual rising action or suspense because you know that the narrator is going to survive since he's the one telling the story. Almost 3 stars. 5) The Murders in the Rue Morgue A tale that is considered the first detective story, written 46 years before the first Sherlock Holmes story in 1887. A gruesome double murder is committed in Rue Morgue in Paris and amateur detective C. Auguste Dupin investigates the crime scene. What he finds is beyond suspicion. 3.5 6) The Mystery of Marie Rogêt A sequel to the previous story. The longest and most boring story so far. It doesn't have a plot. Dupin just discusses with the narrator whether the murdered girl was murdered and then thrown into the river or the other way round, whether her clothes were torn intentionally or not, or whether the newspaper articles were telling the truth or were inventing things about the murder &c. You will enjoy this essay-like story only if you are a forensics/criminology student. 2 stars 7) The Purloined Letter Definitely better story than The Mystery of Marie Rogêt but definitely not as good as The Murders in the Rue Morgue, or moreover an enjoyable reading. It is a discussion more or less of how Dupin managed to take back the Purloined Letter from the villain of the story (a blackmailer) and give it back to the police. They also talk about versions of reality and mathematics. 2.9 stars 8) The Fall of the House of Usher Finally, a decent gothic story by Mr. Poe in this collection. Our narrator arrives at the gloomy, gothic, decaying house of his childhood friend Roderick Usher and the atmosphere is oppressive even for the reader who anticipates this fall of the house that looms over the story like a threat. An eerie story that you enjoy even though some elements remain inexplicable. 3,5 stars 9) The Pit and the Pendulum From Wikipedia: Terror is the feeling of dread and anticipation that precedes the horrifying experience. By contrast, horror is the feeling of revulsion that usually occurs after something frightening is seen, heard, or experienced. So this is a terror story, the narrator describes his experience of being tortured next to a pit full of rats and a pendulum above him is about to cut him in half. The story was a disappointment though even to George R.R. Martin, who while at high school he changed the story into a much gruesome and horrible ending which I approve. 10) The Premature Burial A horror short story on the theme of being buried alive (!) In the first part the narrator describes different cases of premature burials from where some victims escaped and some not! In the second part he describes his own experience as a man who suffers from anxiety of being buried alive. Graves, corpses, tombs, graveyards, mausoleums. Everything I like to read this time of the year. 3.5 11) The Black Cat Violence against animals, which is followed by a series of ghastly revenges. The narrator, a most unlikable character. He deserved everything he suffered (IMO). Moreover the story is a critique of the perverse actions brought on by alcoholism. 3.5 12) The Masque of the Red Death The title says it all: Death. The story starts and ends with death. All the characters of the story die drenched in blood. 3.5 13) The Cask of Amontillado This was one of the first stories I've ever read in English back in 2009 when my English was worse than Tsipras's. Since then I've read it at least 3 more times. A favourite story of revenge, wine, and murder. . . 4 stars. 14) The Oval Portrait From Wikipedia: "The Oval Portrait" is a short story [...] involving the disturbing circumstances surrounding a portrait in a chateau. It is one of his shortest stories, filling only two pages in its initial publication in 1842. I believe this tale might have inspired Oscar Wilde to write his only novel The Picture of Dorian Gray. 3.5 15) The Oblong Box Nice little story but of course I saw what was coming. A mysterious box belonging to an even more mysterious man, on a ship full of passengers. 3 stars because it was simply interesting but not long enough. 16) The Tell-Tale Heart A story that was pretty similar with the Black Cat but with a more sinister feeling and a very unreliable insane person as a narrator. The ending was the same with Black Cat's ending so I was a bit disappointed to read the same thing again. 3.5 stars though. 17) Ligeia The story can be divided into 3 parts. Part 1 where the unnamed narrator describes his wife Ligeia, her appearance and her mind and then she falls ill and dies. Part 2 where the narrator moves to an unnamed gothic abbey in England marries a second wife Rowena who also falls ill and dies. Part 3 is where the supernatural elements of the story come alive. . . Can't say more, you have to read it yourself. Atmospheric and eerie, yet verbose and slow. 3 stars 18) Loss of Breath What a weird little story. A man literally loses his breath and everybody thinks he's a corpse and so they throw him out of a carriage, they dissect him, they hang him, they bury him, but he can't feel anything because he's out of breath! It was strange and macabre but the concept didn't convince me. How is it possible to live after losing your breath? Well it's fiction but again. . . 3 stars 19) Shadow - A Parable A story 3 pages long and it left me standing in the shadows. After 2 readings I was still feeling like an ignoramus. 2 stars 20) Silence - A Fable A fable about a demon and a man in an enchanted land. The demon tells his story, the man listens, and I am confused. Again. . . Can't say more about this story because I simply can't. I just need to point out that the epigraph of this story was in Ancient Greek. εὕδουσι δ΄ ὀρέων κορυφαί τε καὶ φάραγγες πρώονές τε καὶ χαράδραι Since the feeling of the story was quite eerie I will give it 2.9 stars. I'm a good man. 21) The Man of the Crowd A man follows an old man through a crowded London for almost two days and then he decides to stop following him because the old man is the man of the crowd. [...] worse than the Hortulus Anime; and perhaps it is one of the great mercies of God that er laßt sich nicht lesen. Τι λες σοβαρά; Σουαχίλι γιατί ξέχασες να γράψεις; Again no explanation, which left me disappointed even though following a man for such a long time is quite creepy. 3 stars 22) Some Words with a Mummy Finally, the last story, and an interesting one. 4 stars. A group of intellectuals try to revive a mummy and the mummy now revived begins a conversation with the men. It was a witty story, a satire on Epyptomania and a criticism on the supposed superiority of the west. The end was one of the best parts of the story. My wife is a shrew. The truth is, I am heartily sick of this life, and of the nineteenth century in general. I am convinced that everything is going wrong. Besides, I am anxious to know who will be president in 2045. As soon, therefore, as I shave and swallow a cup of coffee, I shall just step over to Ponnonner's and get embalmed for a couple of hundred years. To be honest I'm anxious too to know who will be president of the United States in 2045; if they survive the (likely) Armageddon called Donald Trump. Overall 70.2/22=3.19 which translates into 3 stars. A satisfying collection I had lying unread on my shelves since 2011 but not something I enjoyed 100% Certainly I will buy the 'sequel' to this collection Tales and Poems but I don't think I will bother buying all his writings since it's obvious I will be disappointed by most of them. Well done if you've reached this gargantuan, lengthy, sheety review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Evripidis Gousiaris

    Κάθε ιστορία του σε καθηλώνει σε αναστατώνει και σε ανατριχιάζει! Οι ιστορίες φαντασίας είχαν όλες την δική τους σκοτεινή ατμόσφαιρα και δύσκολα δεν θα σοκάρουν με την εξέλιξη και κατάληξη τους. Οι ιστορίες μυστηρίου όμως ξεπέρασαν κάθε προσδοκία μου καθώς διαπίστωσα τελικά ότι ο Doyle εμπνεύστηκε και βασίστηκε για την δημιουργία του Sherlock Holmes, στον C. Auguste Dupin του Poe. Η δομή, η αφήγηση και το ύφος κάθε περιπέτειας αλλά και η ανάλυση των στοιχείων των δύο ντετέκτιβ είναι πανομοιότυπες Κάθε ιστορία του σε καθηλώνει σε αναστατώνει και σε ανατριχιάζει! Οι ιστορίες φαντασίας είχαν όλες την δική τους σκοτεινή ατμόσφαιρα και δύσκολα δεν θα σοκάρουν με την εξέλιξη και κατάληξη τους. Οι ιστορίες μυστηρίου όμως ξεπέρασαν κάθε προσδοκία μου καθώς διαπίστωσα τελικά ότι ο Doyle εμπνεύστηκε και βασίστηκε για την δημιουργία του Sherlock Holmes, στον C. Auguste Dupin του Poe. Η δομή, η αφήγηση και το ύφος κάθε περιπέτειας αλλά και η ανάλυση των στοιχείων των δύο ντετέκτιβ είναι πανομοιότυπες! Εκπληκτικός ο Poe για άλλη μια φορά!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

    Poe is now a household name. An American institution. Everyone knows Poe, though few have really delved into more than one or two of his short stories. I'm also pretty sure he was completely insane. Which means he was brilliant, and everyone should read his work. As the title of the book says, there are many different stories in here, and admittedly, they are not all of the same caliber. It seems that Poe generally became a better writer as he wrote more and more stuff, and I think his later work Poe is now a household name. An American institution. Everyone knows Poe, though few have really delved into more than one or two of his short stories. I'm also pretty sure he was completely insane. Which means he was brilliant, and everyone should read his work. As the title of the book says, there are many different stories in here, and admittedly, they are not all of the same caliber. It seems that Poe generally became a better writer as he wrote more and more stuff, and I think his later work is (in general!) superior to his earlier work. Some stories in this compendium are 3-star stories, and some are 5-star stories, with the remainder taking 4-stars. All of Poe's popular and well-known shorts are in here, The Cask of Amontillado, The Tell-Tale Heart, The Fall of The House of Usher all make their respective appearances. Some of my favorites ones however, were his lesser known works William Wilson, Morella, and A Descent Into the Malestrom were all fantastic surprises to me. There was even a delightful comedy stowed away in here in the form of Some Passages in the Life of A Lion (Lionizing). Imagine that; an actual comedy from Poe! Though Poe chose the short story as his main body of work, there is a common theme about Poe's work. Poe is, ultimately, a blender. A boundary weakener. A line eraser. The boundaries between life and death, good and evil, one world and another. The line between soundness and insanity. None of these are sacred to Edgar Allan Poe's tinkering, and you can't help but admire Poe for the artful way he manipulates the reader's preconceptions. His methods inspired hosts of other writers to explore the same themes (H.P. Lovecraft obviously, and some of Robert Louis Stevenson's work can all be traced to Poe's influence), yet Poe remains an independent, unique, and terrifyingly brilliant voice. In short: Read Poe! You might hate him and go insane (ah well, can't get them all), you might love him and still go crazy (face it, you were probably crazy to begin with), OR you could become entranced by Poe's stories and start a "Poe Boy's" fan club. Whichever way, you should never be forgiven for not reading as much Poe as you can.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    I have to open with a confession, for those of you who do not know I am a self-confessed Poe obsessive so there is every possibility that this review is a tad biased. Having said that this collection of 10 tales and poems shows his genius at capturing the darker side of humanity, from the ability to torment and torture to the sometimes unbelievable determination to survive, even when pounding on death's door. This collection includes some of my absolute favourites from Poe including The Raven, w I have to open with a confession, for those of you who do not know I am a self-confessed Poe obsessive so there is every possibility that this review is a tad biased. Having said that this collection of 10 tales and poems shows his genius at capturing the darker side of humanity, from the ability to torment and torture to the sometimes unbelievable determination to survive, even when pounding on death's door. This collection includes some of my absolute favourites from Poe including The Raven, which for me is one of the darkest and most heartbreaking poems ever, and The Tell-Tale Heart, which is more than disturbing with it's glimpse into the mind of the guilty. Each tale/poem is illustrated by a different artist so the styles vary with each but they all manage to capture the essence of the associated story and I'm sure Edgar would be rather happy with them too. An excellent collection and a good introduction to one of the masters of the macabre should you need it. The full contents is: MS. Found in a Bottle The Raven Hop-Frog The Tell-Tale Heart The Black Cat The Conqueror Worm The Oval Portrait The Bells The Pit and the Pendulum The Thousand-and-Second Tale of Scheherazade The Masque of the Red Death The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar A Descent into the Maelstrom

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lu

    Tales of Mystery and Imagination is a great compilation of short stories by Egdar Allan Poe, including some of his most appraised works, like "The Tell-Tale Heart", "The Black Cat", and "The Murders in the Rue Morgue"; and quite a few of lesser known - and also great - works, such as "The Colloquy of Monos and Una" and "Berenice". This collection was a good mixture of horror and mystery, and I highly recommend checking out Poe's works if you haven't already!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    Acabei! Muito muito bom!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa - My own book of disquiet

    These were my favourite tales: "A descent into the Maelstrom" 4⭐ "The black cat" 5⭐ "The pit and the pendulum" 5⭐ "The premature burial" 4⭐ "The masque of the Red Death" 5⭐ "The oval portrait" 4⭐ "The murders in the Rue Morgue" 5⭐ "The purloined letter"4⭐ "A tale of the Ragged Mountains" 4⭐

  17. 4 out of 5

    All Mota

    Releer a Poe es un placer, y es un lugar al que vuelves, sin embargo, como todos los libros que tocan, este crece contigo, aunque no ha pasado mucho tiempo desde la ultima vez que lo leí, puedo decir sin dudas que entiendo muchos de los relatos de una forma diferente, el horror descrito y expresado en palabras no es nada comparado al que se intuye, el ser atormentado detrás de todo y la visión que tiene del mundo provoca agonizar y la paranoia que hace crecer en el interior de mi persona con su Releer a Poe es un placer, y es un lugar al que vuelves, sin embargo, como todos los libros que tocan, este crece contigo, aunque no ha pasado mucho tiempo desde la ultima vez que lo leí, puedo decir sin dudas que entiendo muchos de los relatos de una forma diferente, el horror descrito y expresado en palabras no es nada comparado al que se intuye, el ser atormentado detrás de todo y la visión que tiene del mundo provoca agonizar y la paranoia que hace crecer en el interior de mi persona con su maestría en la creación de atmósferas es horriblemente admirable, toda la luz mortecina que recubre los relatos, les da tan desgastada aura que parece que fueran a desmoronarse en uno, o tal vez, uno podría desmoronarse encima de estos. Además, en esta edición puede leer dos/tres relatos que me sorprendieron a sobremanera, y me hacen pensar que nunca leeré nada que no me guste de Poe, maybe I'm just a fan que no puede ser objetivo, pero ¿quien es realmente objetivo?

  18. 5 out of 5

    Carmo

    Há que lhe tirar o chapéu; Edgar Aleen Poe é mesmo o mestre do terror. Dono de uma prosa expressiva que retrata de forma eximia cenários de horror e suspense, não descura pormenores a criar ambientes grotescos. Obcecado pela morte, como se esta fosse o único sentido da vida; não o final de tudo mas sim a última passagem para a eternidade. Sete contos fantásticos: Ligeia, A Queda da Casa de Usher, A Máscara da Morte Vermelha, O Coração Revelador, O Gato Negro, O Barril de Amontillado. Gostei de tod Há que lhe tirar o chapéu; Edgar Aleen Poe é mesmo o mestre do terror. Dono de uma prosa expressiva que retrata de forma eximia cenários de horror e suspense, não descura pormenores a criar ambientes grotescos. Obcecado pela morte, como se esta fosse o único sentido da vida; não o final de tudo mas sim a última passagem para a eternidade. Sete contos fantásticos: Ligeia, A Queda da Casa de Usher, A Máscara da Morte Vermelha, O Coração Revelador, O Gato Negro, O Barril de Amontillado. Gostei de todos sem exceção mas O Poço e o Pêndulo foi de arrepiar; de um ritmo frenético, capaz de nos pôr a roer as unhas e os dedos.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Blair

    I read this compendium of Poe's stories while still at high-school. Loved it then and love it now. Poe was a trailblazer in the mystery, suspense and horror genres and his writing has been hugely influential, changing the world of literature. "The Murders in the Rue Morgue", considered the first modern detective story, is a short masterpiece. Grisly and gory by the standards of its day, this tale is well worth a read today, as are all the other wonderful tales in this collection of Poe's works. I I read this compendium of Poe's stories while still at high-school. Loved it then and love it now. Poe was a trailblazer in the mystery, suspense and horror genres and his writing has been hugely influential, changing the world of literature. "The Murders in the Rue Morgue", considered the first modern detective story, is a short masterpiece. Grisly and gory by the standards of its day, this tale is well worth a read today, as are all the other wonderful tales in this collection of Poe's works. In particular, "The Tell-Tale Heart" and "The Pit and the Pendulum".

  20. 5 out of 5

    Maria João Fernandes

    Este livro reúne um conjunto de contos que, acima de tudo, se debruça sobre o sobrenatural - os fantasmas, a morte - que provoca distúrbios em vidas que podiam ser a nossa. A primeira história é sobre uma mulher chamada Ligeia. Uma mulher bonita e inteligente, amada por um homem, que deixou viúvo. Este homem sente a dor da perda, mas segue o seu caminho, encontrando outra pessoa. Nesta história de amor e sofrimento, os fantasmas não são assustadores, antes pelo contrário, são bem vindos. Por outro Este livro reúne um conjunto de contos que, acima de tudo, se debruça sobre o sobrenatural - os fantasmas, a morte - que provoca distúrbios em vidas que podiam ser a nossa. A primeira história é sobre uma mulher chamada Ligeia. Uma mulher bonita e inteligente, amada por um homem, que deixou viúvo. Este homem sente a dor da perda, mas segue o seu caminho, encontrando outra pessoa. Nesta história de amor e sofrimento, os fantasmas não são assustadores, antes pelo contrário, são bem vindos. Por outro lado, no conto "A Máscara da Morte Vermelha", o mistério do desconhecido não é algo por que alguém ansie. Não é bom deixarmos-nos dominar pelo medo, mas também é perigoso livrar-nos totalmente dele. Pois não ter medo não significa que estamos livres de perigo. Podemos mesmo estar abrir portas. Se tivesse de escolher o meu conto preferido, penso que diria "O Gato Negro" pelo terror dos pensamentos da personagem da principal e pelas suas acções tão ou mais horríveis. As pessoas boas são raras, mas as pessoas boas que se mantêm longe do mal ainda mais raras são. Entre outros, "O Barril de Amontillado" e "O Poço e o Pêndulo", mostram-nos diferentes facetas de seres humanos, cujas naturezas são assombradas pelo que têm de melhor e pior, definindo as suas acções para com aqueles que os rodeiam. Edgar Allan Poe foca-se nos distúrbios que ocupam as nossas mentes e nas inevitáveis consequências nas nossas vidas. As suas personagens habitam os seus contos, mas podiam muito bem habitar na casa ao nosso lado.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    First who reads Poe to their kiddies though I suppose it's no worse than some of the fairy stories the kids like. Speaking of fairy tales, though I know it's not his best, I couldn't help wishing 'The Island of the Fay' was included not because it's his best story but because I think it would make for an evocative illustration. Obviously not all of Poe's stories are included in this volume though probably two-thirds are. I think every story has a picture though not all have a color illustration. First who reads Poe to their kiddies though I suppose it's no worse than some of the fairy stories the kids like. Speaking of fairy tales, though I know it's not his best, I couldn't help wishing 'The Island of the Fay' was included not because it's his best story but because I think it would make for an evocative illustration. Obviously not all of Poe's stories are included in this volume though probably two-thirds are. I think every story has a picture though not all have a color illustration. Some of the black and and white pictures are as good as the color ones. Oddly the color illustrations aren't with the story they depict but scattered throughout the book. None have more than four or five colors and I believe I counted ten color illustrations in all. The black and white pictures are with thei proper text and two that stood out are of 'The Pit and the Pendulum' and 'The Muders in the Rue Morgue'. The Pit pic is notable for the horrified expression and the Rue Morgue because the shadowed figures trail lacelike tendrils from he ladies gowns and some of th gents clothes and hair and even the dogs fur which helps depict their made race to find the killer. The pictures are evocative of the 19th century though per the back of the title pages it states that Arthur Rackham's Poe work was first shown in 1935. A word about the volume itself; it has no dust jacket to lose in the nursery but it's sturdy and has a small set in color illustration on the cover. There's also a slate gray silk cord to mark your place in the book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mr.MeHr

    داستان های این مجموعه در پادگان، به ساعت هفت صبح(پس از آمار گیری)، با سختی بسیار، مطالعه شد داستان های «پرتره بیضوی» و «مورلا» (و شعر «کلاغ» که در این کتاب نیست) مستحق شش ستاره بودند، «گربه سیاه» و «قلب رازگو» در حد چهار ستاره بودند، مابقی صرفاً تازگی داشت بدون هیچ نکته جذابی بورخس توی یک سبک از داستان هاش کاملاً از روش پو پیروی کرده است می توان مدعی شد صادق هدایت(رض) از نظر فضای داستانی در آثاری مثل «سه قطره خون» یا «بوف کور» خیلی به پو نزدیک شده است برخی معتقدند جنس خشونت موجود در آثار داستایفسکی داستان های این مجموعه در پادگان، به ساعت هفت صبح(پس از آمار گیری)، با سختی بسیار، مطالعه شد داستان های «پرتره بیضوی» و «مورلا» (و شعر «کلاغ» که در این کتاب نیست) مستحق شش ستاره بودند، «گربه سیاه» و «قلب رازگو» در حد چهار ستاره بودند، مابقی صرفاً تازگی داشت بدون هیچ‌ نکته جذابی بورخس توی یک سبک از داستان هاش کاملاً از روش پو پیروی کرده است می توان مدعی شد صادق هدایت(رض) از نظر فضای داستانی در آثاری مثل «سه قطره خون» یا «بوف کور» خیلی به پو نزدیک شده است برخی معتقدند جنس خشونت موجود در آثار داستایفسکی(ع) از پو ملهم شده‌است، اصلاً مورد پذیرش من نیست

  23. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Strömquist

    Partly, but quite sufficiently different selection of Poe's stories compared to Selected Tales, which I also have and re-read from time to time. Absorbing, suspenseful, chilling and very very good!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Yiota Misiou

    Τρείς ιστορίες μυστηρίου του Πόε, σε μια υπέροχη έκδοση. Σκληρό εξώφυλλο και ιλουστρασιόν σελίδες με υπέροχη και απόλυτα ταιριαστή εικονογράφηση. Πέρασα όμορφα διαβάζοντάς το και πίνοντας τον καφέ μου.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    Edgar Allan Poe es un genio. Excelente libro y genial autor, un libro muy recomendable.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Imke

    Personally, his hort stories did not entice me that much. Poe Seems to save the weirdest things he could came up with for the shortest ones. I think he shines brighter in his works that contain 10+ pages. I especially enjoyed the detective stories: they are just dripping with gruesome details, which for me, makes it oh so much more enjoyable. This edition of his collected works is just beautiful. The gorgeous drawings and lay-out take the experience of reading this work to another level.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mariana

    Really good. The principles of science methodology and the challenge of moral's limits appears clearly. Strange characters, sarcasm, violence, addiction and fear get together to get you into an atmosphere of the "beyond".

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mohammad Ali

    داستانی نسبتا خوب: "نوشته ای که در یک بطری پیدا شده"، "گرداب مالستروم"، "آدمی کشی های کوچه ی مّرگ"، و "لیجیا" داستان خوب: "چاه و پاندول" ( هر چند آغازش گنگی و ابهام دارد ) ادگار آلن پو در به تصویر کشیدن فضاهای تنگ و تاریک و ... مهارت ویژه ای دارد. در برخی داستان ها "راز"ها با استفاده از قدرت "تحلیل" - که پو اصرار دارد غیر از مهارت محاسبه ی ریاضی است - حل می شوند اما در برخی همچنان سر به مهر باقی می مانند. ترجمه عموما خوب است اما در اواخر کتاب ابهام هایی - بعضا ناشی از غلط ها ی چاپی و ... - وجود دار داستانی نسبتا خوب: "نوشته ای که در یک بطری پیدا شده"، "گرداب مالستروم"، "آدمی کشی های کوچه ی مّرگ"، و "لیجیا" داستان خوب: "چاه و پاندول" ( هر چند آغازش گنگی و ابهام دارد ) ادگار آلن پو در به تصویر کشیدن فضاهای تنگ و تاریک و ... مهارت ویژه ای دارد. در برخی داستان ها "راز"ها با استفاده از قدرت "تحلیل" - که پو اصرار دارد غیر از مهارت محاسبه ی ریاضی است - حل می شوند اما در برخی همچنان سر به مهر باقی می مانند. ترجمه عموما خوب است اما در اواخر کتاب ابهام هایی - بعضا ناشی از غلط ها ی چاپی و ... - وجود دارد که بر ابهام ذاتی متن افزون می شود و بعضا آزار دهنده می گردد.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Rios

    Poe es el mejor! Esa intriga que maneja para narrar y esa oscuridad que hace sentir es increíble, mis cuentos favoritos, de los 12 que tenía el libro fueron: 1. William Wilson 2. Los crímenes de la Rue Morgue 3. La máscara de la muerte roja 4. El pozo y el péndulo 5. El escarabajo de oro 6. El gato negro 7. El tonel de amontillado No me sorprende que en su tiempo, Poe fuera tan censurado, su manera de escribir es muy darks haha pero es genial y más cuando de resolver misterios se trata, crea pistas y ac Poe es el mejor! Esa intriga que maneja para narrar y esa oscuridad que hace sentir es increíble, mis cuentos favoritos, de los 12 que tenía el libro fueron: 1. William Wilson 2. Los crímenes de la Rue Morgue 3. La máscara de la muerte roja 4. El pozo y el péndulo 5. El escarabajo de oro 6. El gato negro 7. El tonel de amontillado No me sorprende que en su tiempo, Poe fuera tan censurado, su manera de escribir es muy darks haha pero es genial y más cuando de resolver misterios se trata, crea pistas y acertijos muy bien elaborados. Excelentes cuentos!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gláucia Renata

    De preferência sozinho, noite fria ou tempestuosa, música sóbria ao fundo. Está criado um ambiente que irá exacerbar o efeito dos contos góticos de Poe. Aqui estão presentes alguns de seus melhores contos, outros não achei grande coisa. Mas O Poço e o Pêndulo me aflige sempre que leio e O Gato me faz gelar o sangue. Sinistro...

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