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Children of Blood and Bone

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They killed my mother. They took our magic. They tried to bury us. Now we rise. Zélie Adebola remembers when the soil of Orïsha hummed with magic. Burners ignited flames, Tiders beckoned waves, and Zélie’s Reaper mother summoned forth souls. But everything changed the night magic disappeared. Under the orders of a ruthless king, maji were killed, leaving Zélie without a mother They killed my mother. They took our magic. They tried to bury us. Now we rise. Zélie Adebola remembers when the soil of Orïsha hummed with magic. Burners ignited flames, Tiders beckoned waves, and Zélie’s Reaper mother summoned forth souls. But everything changed the night magic disappeared. Under the orders of a ruthless king, maji were killed, leaving Zélie without a mother and her people without hope. Now Zélie has one chance to bring back magic and strike against the monarchy. With the help of a rogue princess, Zélie must outwit and outrun the crown prince, who is hell-bent on eradicating magic for good. Danger lurks in Orïsha, where snow leoponaires prowl and vengeful spirits wait in the waters. Yet the greatest danger may be Zélie herself as she struggles to control her powers and her growing feelings for an enemy.


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They killed my mother. They took our magic. They tried to bury us. Now we rise. Zélie Adebola remembers when the soil of Orïsha hummed with magic. Burners ignited flames, Tiders beckoned waves, and Zélie’s Reaper mother summoned forth souls. But everything changed the night magic disappeared. Under the orders of a ruthless king, maji were killed, leaving Zélie without a mother They killed my mother. They took our magic. They tried to bury us. Now we rise. Zélie Adebola remembers when the soil of Orïsha hummed with magic. Burners ignited flames, Tiders beckoned waves, and Zélie’s Reaper mother summoned forth souls. But everything changed the night magic disappeared. Under the orders of a ruthless king, maji were killed, leaving Zélie without a mother and her people without hope. Now Zélie has one chance to bring back magic and strike against the monarchy. With the help of a rogue princess, Zélie must outwit and outrun the crown prince, who is hell-bent on eradicating magic for good. Danger lurks in Orïsha, where snow leoponaires prowl and vengeful spirits wait in the waters. Yet the greatest danger may be Zélie herself as she struggles to control her powers and her growing feelings for an enemy.

30 review for Children of Blood and Bone

  1. 4 out of 5

    Emma Giordano

    5 STARS! This is genuinely the greatest debut fantasy novel, greatest fantasy novel in general that I have read in a very long time. Initially, I was TERRIFIED to read Children of Blood and Bone. The combination of it’s size and an epic high fantasy novel was very daunting to me, but I am so happy I picked it up. I cannot possibly recommend it enough. The writing was fantastic. Despite being such a large novel, the pacing was well-done, where I felt I was flying through the novel much quicker tha 5 STARS! This is genuinely the greatest debut fantasy novel, greatest fantasy novel in general that I have read in a very long time. Initially, I was TERRIFIED to read Children of Blood and Bone. The combination of it’s size and an epic high fantasy novel was very daunting to me, but I am so happy I picked it up. I cannot possibly recommend it enough. The writing was fantastic. Despite being such a large novel, the pacing was well-done, where I felt I was flying through the novel much quicker than many other long fantasy novels. Adeyemi has a beautiful prose that compliments such a vibrant world and mystical magic system. All elements of Orisha were flawlessly executed – the history, the divide among maji/diviners vs. nobles, the different types of magic, ALL OF IT. I’m totally infatuated with this world and cannot wait to see it expand in following novels. I really loved the characters in this story. Zelie is such a fierce warrior. I loved watching her strength grow, but also still preserving some of her innocence and vulnerability. I feel that she is such a wonderful protagonist that so many will fall in love with. Amari is another character I LOVE. Her character transformation was really well done. It was so nice to see a girl start out meek and afraid but slowly grow into herself and become more comfortable in a group of people totally different from her. I also find the friendship that develops between Zelie and Amari to be so sweet. They are so different and would not get along at an eye's glance, but I enjoyed watching them grow to support each other. Inan is a character I also loved, but I did have some issues with. I loved him as the vengeful prince out to prevent Zelie and Amari from bringing magic back. he was a GREAT villain to follow from the beginning with a ton of layers, and it was especially cool to follow the antagonist's perspective for once in YA. But as the story progresses and the characters go through new things, I found his characterization to be a bit off-putting. Inan is a very intense character to begin with and his changes are equally drastic. To keep it spoiler-free, there were some times where I felt his feelings and reactions just didn't make sense and flipped around a lot. I do still love him as much as the others, and I am definitely anticipating seeing more from this epic cast in the future. There is so much action in this story. There are endless chase scenes, epic battles using swords, staffs, bows, and different kinds of magic. There are unexpected twists and turns and just so much intensity. The plot is wonderfully constructed with so much to enjoy. Children of Blood and Bone will totally keep you on the edge of your seat the entire time while reading - but you won't be able to *completely* predict what's coming next. I'm completely obsessed with Children of Blood and Bone. My favorite new-to-me start to a fantasy saga. Surely, one of my favorites of the year. This book has gotten so much hype even before it's publication, and it is totally deserving of every ounce of it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Emily May

    “No matter how much I crave peace, the gods have other plans.” 4 1/2 stars. Wow, I have had quite a week. I started Children of Blood and Bone last Thursday as I was going into labour (because, why not?). Normally, I would devour a book like this in a day or two, but those of you with kids will know that's just not going to happen with a newborn. Instead, this book rode with me through the hospital stay, sleepless nights, and postpartum weepies. It kept my eyes open on those long, long nights. “No matter how much I crave peace, the gods have other plans.” 4 1/2 stars. Wow, I have had quite a week. I started Children of Blood and Bone last Thursday as I was going into labour (because, why not?). Normally, I would devour a book like this in a day or two, but those of you with kids will know that's just not going to happen with a newborn. Instead, this book rode with me through the hospital stay, sleepless nights, and postpartum weepies. It kept my eyes open on those long, long nights. It picked me up and threw me into another world of action and magic right when I needed it. All I can say is: Thank you, Ms Adeyemi. Oh okay, that's not all I can say. Though hopefully I don't sound too delirious. Children of Blood and Bone is a West-African inspired fantasy set in the fictional land of Orïsha. It takes all the best bits of YA fantasy - princesses, tormented soldiers, the battle to restore magic vs suppress it - and does something completely new with these familiar elements. At its core, it's an action-packed, fast-paced adventure to restore magic to the world and complete a ritual before the approaching solstice is over and magic is lost forever. Beneath that, though, there are many darker themes. The plot is intense and steeped in racially-charged violence. Adeyemi draws many parallels with our own world, forcing the reader to pause and consider systemic racism and injustice in prison systems. And Zélie remembers the genocide executed on King Saran's orders all too well. The "Raid", as it is known, took her mother from her. Now, Zélie is a divîner - a maji without magic, though her abilities lie dormant, waiting for the missing scroll that can return her power. The book is told from alternating perspectives. One is Zélie, another is Princess Amari who Zélie reluctantly saves from the King's men, and the third is Amara's brother, Inan, who is sent to chase down and stop his sister and Zélie. With complex characters who naturally change and grow as the story progresses, I was hooked. I cared what happened to all three of them. There was never a boring moment. It is always risky to step into a book as hyped as this one, but I, for one, think it very much deserves it. A compelling, exciting plot, a completely non-white cast of characters, AND a thoughtful consideration of race, skin colour, and prejudice... impressive, to say the least. Though that cliffhanger is EVIL. How will we cope until the next book? Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tomi Adeyemi

    You'll like this book. I'm biased, but I need to meet my goodreads challenge so I'm marking this as read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Emily (Books with Emily Fox)

    THE HYPE IS REAL! I always prefer to decide for myself if the new overhyped YA book is worth it... and I'm happy to say that this new Fantasy book totally was! I loved the magic system, the world, the characters and cannot wait for the next book! My only complain is with the romance. I hate romance. I hate how everyone needs to be paired up especially in YA and how cheesy it is. I kinda wish this series was adult instead but if you're looking for a book you'll fly through I totally recommend this o THE HYPE IS REAL! I always prefer to decide for myself if the new overhyped YA book is worth it... and I'm happy to say that this new Fantasy book totally was! I loved the magic system, the world, the characters and cannot wait for the next book! My only complain is with the romance. I hate romance. I hate how everyone needs to be paired up especially in YA and how cheesy it is. I kinda wish this series was adult instead but if you're looking for a book you'll fly through I totally recommend this one! Will impatiently wait for book #2!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nenia ✨ Queen of Literary Trash, Protector of Out-of-Print Gems, Khaleesi of Bodice Rippers, Mother of Smut, the Unrepentant, Breaker of Convention ✨ Campbell

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest WELP. Looks like this book is joining THRONE OF GLASS on the books-that-made-me-lose-friends shelf. Note: I'm going to start blocking people who come onto this review to tell me that I have read or reviewed it incorrectly. I tried it, I didn't like it, I wrote about my feelings. What do you want? A five-star review? Write your own. 😊 After reading some of the five-star reviews for this book, I'm reevaluating how much I trust some of my frien Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest WELP. Looks like this book is joining THRONE OF GLASS on the books-that-made-me-lose-friends shelf. Note: I'm going to start blocking people who come onto this review to tell me that I have read or reviewed it incorrectly. I tried it, I didn't like it, I wrote about my feelings. What do you want? A five-star review? Write your own. 😊 After reading some of the five-star reviews for this book, I'm reevaluating how much I trust some of my friends. This was a terrible book. I don't think I've been this disappointed since picking up FLAME IN THE MIST or THRONE OF GLASS. What the hell were you guys reading? Is there a "good" version and a "shitty" version? What happened? I specifically chose to read CHILDREN OF BLOOD AND BONE after AMERICANAH because I thought they would complement each other well and lead to some interesting parallels that I could discuss in my review. AMERICANAH is a book that discusses the racial and cultural issues of real-life Nigeria, and CHILDREN OF BLOOD AND BONE is a book that discusses racial and cultural issues of a fantasy-inspired country based on Nigeria. I loved AMERICANAH and I was so sure that I would love CHILDREN OF BLOOD AND BONE because it's exactly what so many readers have been asking for: Diverse Fantasy! CHILDREN OF BLOOD AND BONE is a fantasy novel inspired by Nigerian mythology, specifically focusing on the Orisha. In this world, magic is forbidden and those who are descended from the maji are called "maggots" and systematically oppressed, if not killed outright. It's narrated by three characters, Zelie, who is a maji and a target of these genocidal tactics employed by their ruler, and also Inan and his sister, whose name I can't remember, who are the children of the evil king, but also maji, so uh-oh, nobody better find out or anything because that would be awkward. Zelie runs away, accompanied by that sister, and Inan hunts them down while fighting his unwanted (of course) attraction to her. Because he can see her in dreams. *eye roll* All the people saying this book is action-packed must either never read good fantasy, are reading a completely different edition from mine, or are lying outright, because this was the LONGEST 500-something pages I've ever read BECAUSE IT'S SO SLOW-PACED, OMG. I didn't care about any of the characters. When the climax happens, we're supposed to be so worried for poor Zelie, but I didn't care because her voice is completely interchangeable with the other two. Characters appear whenever it's convenient for the plot, and there's a romance thrown in haphazardly because what's a YA without mediocre romance? Because that's what this is. Just another generic fantasy story with cardboard cut-out characters and a tepid romance that lacks chemistry. The only thing that sets it apart is the setting and mythology. I want to close with these thoughts. I get why so many people are excited about this book. It's thrilling to read books about people who are like you and have a narrative that you identify with. I emphasized that (more nicely) in my review of TYLER JOHNSON WAS HERE. Even if I thought it was a bad book, I can appreciate the meaning and importance it has for people who are seeking out those stories. Fantasy novels are notorious for having bad rep, and when you do see characters of color, they often fit neatly under the cringe-worthy Magical Negro umbrella, which is not cool. That's a huge reason behind why I was so ready to embrace this book: I want those diverse stories too. Stories that give a new perspective and delve into territories that aren't explored nearly enough. However, I have seen people on Tumblr and Goodreads posting status updates about how they don't think people should be allowed to write negative reviews for diverse books because the intentions of the author supersede the quality of the writing itself. I am 100% NOT OKAY with that, and here's why: if you do that, you're going to create a culture of mediocrity, where people will feel comfortable churning out poor-quality books while using diversity the way you might use a checklist. I'm not saying that TYLER JOHNSON and CHILDREN OF BLOOD AND BONE fall into that category, but by shutting down valid criticism and enabling poor story-telling, this is going to be a problem. Part of me kind of wondered if the publication of CHILDREN OF BLOOD AND BONE may have been rushed so the release date coincided with that of Black Panther. That could explain some of the problems. I wondered the same thing about CARVE THE MARK (a book that was seemingly inspired by Star Wars) and the closeness of its release date to Rogue One. For reference, CARVE THE MARK was published January 17, 2017 and Rogue One was released on December 10, 2016. Likewise, Black Panther came out on February 16, 2018 and CHILDREN OF BLOOD AND BONE was published on March 6, 2018. From a marketing perspective, it's a brilliant move, but a rushed release date could explain some of the pacing issues and the not-so-great writing. I apologize if this seems harsh, but I am a book blogger who has always tried to be 100% honest even if that opinion is not popular. I have had people tell me that they will or won't buy books based on my reviews because they know I won't deceive them or sugar-coat. I rate on a purely entertainment-based rubric and don't take things like literary merit or the author's intentions into account. CHILDREN OF BLOOD AND BONE had wonderful intentions... but I thought it was a really sloppy, generic fantasy novel, and I am rating it as such. Maybe you'll get the "good" version everyone's raving about. ;-) 1 star

  6. 5 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    Gah! I was just talking about how I hoped I get my poster for the book and it came and it's freaking awesome! ♥ I loved this book so much! ❤ This book is everything and I have a new favorite author =) I try not to think of her. But when I do, I think of rice. When Mama was around, the hut always smelled of jollof rice. I think about the way her dark skin glowed like the summer sun, the way her smile made Baba come alive. The way her white hair fuzzed and coiled, an untamed crown that breathed and Gah! I was just talking about how I hoped I get my poster for the book and it came and it's freaking awesome! ♥ I loved this book so much! ❤️ This book is everything and I have a new favorite author =) I try not to think of her. But when I do, I think of rice. When Mama was around, the hut always smelled of jollof rice. I think about the way her dark skin glowed like the summer sun, the way her smile made Baba come alive. The way her white hair fuzzed and coiled, an untamed crown that breathed and thrived. I hear the myths that she would tell me at night. Tzain's laughter when they played agbon in the park. Baba's cries as the soldiers wrapped a chain around her neck. Her screams as they dragged her into the dark. The incantations that spewed from her mouth like lava. The magic of death that led her astray. I think about the way her corpse hung from that tree. I think about the king that took her away. I love Zelie so much and I also love Amari and Zelie's brother Tzain and Nailah < -- I'm not telling you what she is =) I eventually fell in love with Inan too. And there are a lot of minor characters that were awesome! I love this whole story line. I love that Zelie and Amari are two very tough women who should be enemies but become friends. I love, love, love everything! Amari and Inan's father is the evil king. He killed magic so to speak a long time ago. I hate him so much and I'm so glad that Amari came to see his evilness first hand. He wants to keep the Diviner's down and treats them unfairly. This is what Zelie and her family are and some are a little bit more. The little group of Zelie, Amari, Tzain and Nailah set out to try to bring magic back. And you can imagine all kinds of things happen during their journey. I had so many feels during this book and I think everyone that loves fantasy should give it a try because it's like nothing I have read and it's awesome! *Sings praises* It's his blood. It's him. The ultimate sacrifice. The greatest blood magic I could wield. "Kill her!" The first two guards charge at me, swords pointed and raised. They run with a vengeance. The last mistake they will ever make. We are all children of blood and bone. All instruments of vengeance and virtue. This truth holds me close, rocking me like a child in it's mother's arms. It binds me in its love as death swallows me into its grasp. This is just the beginning, lovelies =) I can't wait for the next book! Happy Reading! Mel ♥ MY BLOG: Melissa Martin's Reading List AMAZON: REVIEW

  7. 5 out of 5

    Roxane

    This was a gripping read. The world building here is phenomenal. The main characters are richly drawn and I was invested in each of their struggles. This book is very action packed. So much is happening! The ending is such a cliffhanger and I want to know what’s next. This is well worth reading and such a strong debut. Tzarin could be more developed. Who is he beyond his sister’s protector? At times the story felt overly dramatic. Zelie and Inan were deep in their feelings all the time and it be This was a gripping read. The world building here is phenomenal. The main characters are richly drawn and I was invested in each of their struggles. This book is very action packed. So much is happening! The ending is such a cliffhanger and I want to know what’s next. This is well worth reading and such a strong debut. Tzarin could be more developed. Who is he beyond his sister’s protector? At times the story felt overly dramatic. Zelie and Inan were deep in their feelings all the time and it became frustrating. Like calm down teens. Get ahold of yourselves! Amari is the only one with any sense. They should just listen to her tbh.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lola

    I want to join Zélie and Amari’s squad badly. When you’re a university student, it’s very hard to finish a 500-page book in less than two days and not be five assignments behind, especially this close to the end of the semester. But here we are, with me still alive and breathing and on track, as impossible as this may seem. I have to thank the author for making this a fast-paced story that does not include a guessing game in every new chapter – otherwise I wouldn’t have been able to read this one I want to join Zélie and Amari’s squad badly. When you’re a university student, it’s very hard to finish a 500-page book in less than two days and not be five assignments behind, especially this close to the end of the semester. But here we are, with me still alive and breathing and on track, as impossible as this may seem. I have to thank the author for making this a fast-paced story that does not include a guessing game in every new chapter – otherwise I wouldn’t have been able to read this one on the bus and between classes. Surprisingly enough, Children of Blood and Bone is one of those impressive stories that the more you read, the more important it becomes to you. It’s also one that has an intense progression, so much that when you look back at the first chapter, it’s as though you are in another story entirely. This also means that the characters warm up to you gradually – they are not ones that you can automatically imagine yourself being best friends with. Even now, I admire Zélie and Amari profoundly, but I do wonder what we would talk about in real life, seeing that the girls’ minds are almost entirely on the issues to be solved. They do not discuss trivial matters, between themselves or with other characters, thus contributing to the sober atmosphere of the tale. But if I were in this world, I would do everything in my means to be part of their group. Together, they can truly move mountains. The writing does, however, pull you in in a matter of seconds. It’s very focused on describing the actions and emotions of the protagonists from the first person point of view but without overdramatizing the situation. Getting inside the characters’ heads is important because they not only have to deal with external battles, they must extinguish internal ones, too, at times. And since you’re dying to know why I dared take off a star, it’s simple enough: The magic in this world disappeared eleven years ago. I didn’t think it would make a difference if it disappeared a year ago or a hundred years ago, but the protagonists remembering what it was like to have magic made me feel like I wasn’t one hundred percent in sync with them. Not only that, but it would have been more powerful if Zélie had discovered magic after centuries of not having it around. But it really is an astounding debut novel. After that ending, I am all the more intrigued to see where this series goes. Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’

  9. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    ARC provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Buddy read with Adri! 🦊 (And my favorite BookTube reviews: Frankie's, Tati's, & Lauren's!) “You crushed us to build your monarchy on the backs of our blood and bone. Your mistake wasn’t keeping us alive. It was thinking we’d never fight back!” Children of Blood and Bone is worth every ounce of hype and praise it has received thus far, and I only anticipate it to receive more and more, especially since you’re all ab ARC provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Buddy read with Adri! 🦊 (And my favorite BookTube reviews: Frankie's, Tati's, & Lauren's!) “You crushed us to build your monarchy on the backs of our blood and bone. Your mistake wasn’t keeping us alive. It was thinking we’d never fight back!” Children of Blood and Bone is worth every ounce of hype and praise it has received thus far, and I only anticipate it to receive more and more, especially since you’re all about to read a gush review for it. The world is amazing, the characters are so real feeling, the writing is perfect, the action is abundant, the romances are beautiful, the topics are important. This was such a fantastic read, and even though it is only late January, I have no doubts that Children of Blood and Bone will make my best of 2018 list, and I wouldn’t be surprised if it even takes the number one spot come December 31st. I’m also honored to say that this is the very first book I’ve given five stars to in 2018. In this world of Orïsha, magic used to thrive and be celebrated. Our main protagonist, Zélie, remembers this time and what a powerful Divîner her mother was. But she also remembers the way her mother’s body looked, when it was left on display the day that magic died. “I think about the way her corpse hung from that tree. I think about the king who took her away.” Now, the king of Orïsha wants to make sure magic is kept dead, while also keeping all the Divîners that live in Orïsha oppressed. The king ensures that the Divîners are reminded they are lesser, in hopes that they will forget how powerful they once were, along with everyone else. And this has worked, for the last eleven years, that is until a powerful artifact is found and if it is combined with a couple other powerful artifacts it can bring magic back to Orïsha once and for all. When a Maji is born with white hair, it is a sign that they are touched by the Gods, so they are called Divîners. And back before magic disappeared, when a Divîner turned thirteen, they would develop what kind of power they had from whatever God had touched them. The powers range from healing, to taming animals, to wielding light, to controlling time, to making fire, to calling water, to controlling people’s minds and dreams, to even more things! They were very powerful, and the ordinary people didn’t like them being that powerful, so they had to shut them down and keep them down. “No matter how much I crave peace, the gods have other plans.” This story truly focuses on two sets of siblings. One set is Zélie and her brother Tzain, who are currently living in Eloirin, which is surrounded by water, with their father. Yet, the people in Eloirin are forced to pay a Divîner tax, and the prince keeps raising them higher and higher. And if you can’t pay it, then you are forced to perform hard labor (or other worse things) until your debt is paid off. But that’s the thing, you’ll just accumulate more and more debt, and you will never be free again. You will die a slave. And Zélie ‘s family is unsure how they are going to afford to pay the tax for her, so they are forced to go to the city of Lagose to trade. Then, Zélie and Tzain’s story mixes with the other sibling’s story by pure fate of the Gods. Amari is the daughter of the king that has done everything to destroy magic. Yet, this princess is nothing like her tyrant of a father. And once her father does something completely unthinkable and totally heartless, Amari flees her royal life once and for all. Inan is the king in waiting and Amari’s older brother. He is probably the most interesting character in this book, because he constantly is struggling between what he wants to be and what has always been forced upon him. And he is tasked to bring Amari back to their king of a father, by whatever means necessary. Then, these four young adults, from very different upbringings, come together to change the fate of Orïsha forever. “They built this world for you, built it to love you. They never cursed at you in the streets, never broke down the doors of your home. They didn’t drag your mother by her neck and hang her for the whole world to see.” This story is truly unforgettable, and I loved it more than any words I can string together to form a review. The world building is expertly done, and perfectly interwoven through the story. The magic system is so unique and was an absolute joy to learn and read about. Zélie is everything I want in a main protagonist, and her castmates are nothing short of amazing, too. This book was everything I’ve ever wanted from the fantasy genre. The writing in this is so very lyrical. I was completely blown away by the magnificent prose. This story is just told so beautifully, I think it would be hard not to fall in love with it. And I want to emphasize that romance is never at the forefront of this story, but some of the one liners that Tomi Adeyemi gave me where truly some of the most romantic lines I’ve ever read. I can’t believe this is her debut novel. Please, just give her all the awards now, because her writing is truly on another level. “You have your duty and your heart. To choose one means the other must suffer.” And the messages and parallels to our world, from systemic racism, to prison systems, to so much more, are so very important. I know this is a YA high fantasy novel, but I hope people can’t miss the similarities to the very society we are living in today. And every single character in this book is beautifully black. Yet, the author does such a wonderful job touching on how people perceive darker skinned individuals to lighter skinned individuals in this world. In this world, the royals want to look as light as possible. Even going as far as to make sure their skin is always powdered, and it is shunned to spend too much time outside where you could become darker. Yet, this young girl, Zélie, with the darkest skin, living in poverty and dealing with the brutal murder of her mother, could be the most powerful person in Orïsha, yet she is viewed as nothing more than a racial slur. This book is powerful, eye opening, and I hope you all take more out of it besides it being an amazing, five starred story. “I won’t let your ignorance silence my pain.” This book was a masterpiece. Again, I know with my whole soul that this book will make my best of 2018 list without question. I loved this book with the sum of my being and I know it is going to make so many other’s lists, too. Tomi Adeyemi will forever and always be an auto-buy author for me, because this is maybe the strongest debut novel I have ever read in my entire life. Perfection. Trigger/Content warnings for attempted rape, physical abuse, death, gore, murder, torture, war themes, and similar things in that vein. “The truth cuts like the sharpest knife I’ve ever known. No matter what I do, I will always be afraid.” Blog | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Youtube | Twitch The quotes above were taken from an ARC and are subject to change upon publication.

  10. 5 out of 5

    ❄️Nani❄️

    I have very little to say about this debut so I’ll keep this short and concise. Sooo, does the book that made headlines well before it was even published live up to its hype? It truly saddens me to say this but unfortunately, no. It did not for me and I’m pretty certain I’m in the minority. At its core, this book is about Institutional racism and oppression so I (really and truly) loved the the message it was relaying but I hated the execution. What could have been an epic fantasy was ruined by i I have very little to say about this debut so I’ll keep this short and concise. Sooo, does the book that made headlines well before it was even published live up to its hype? It truly saddens me to say this but unfortunately, no. It did not for me and I’m pretty certain I’m in the minority. At its core, this book is about Institutional racism and oppression so I (really and truly) loved the the message it was relaying but I hated the execution. What could have been an epic fantasy was ruined by its immature characters and somewhat inconsistent pacing. I loved the west African setting and the overall point of the story had such depth to it that touched a chord with me. Explorations of social power, the deft portrayal of racial tensions and persecution, the prejudice and structural inequalities that resonate with our own world/time would’ve been enough for me to give this all the star rating in the world but I had so many other issues with it which I found too hard to overlook. Let’s put aside the overly recycled plot and start with my three biggest problems: the romance, the magic system and the characters. - The magic wasn’t as firmly defined as I would’ve liked and there were so many inconsistencies and discrepancies there. It was written like I was expected to know everything as to the machinations without any explanations whatsoever. - The characters, however, I had the most problem with. Save for Tzain, Zalie’s brother, I really didn’t like any of them, or I did at the start and… all went downhill toward the end. So many of their childish and immature actions kept pulling me out of the story and at a certain point it became too hard to enjoy the book for what it was, especially where Zélie was concerned... I mean, how immature could a 16/17 year-old be? And that sentence she kept repeating: ’I let out a breath I didn’t know I was holding.’ I just... how do I even express my rage? I hated the romance. I HATED IT. It was incredibly unnecessary, overly contrived and it blossomed literally in a matter of hours……..HOURS, people. It wasn’t just that it was the definition of insta-love, it was also… so uncomfortable to read about and I found myself continualy fuming at what I was reading, screaming at the book: how do you not… how does this not….!! (spoilers). Not to mention cringing at every turn. Inan, though his POV was my favourite out of the three, his character was aggravating to say the least. His indecisiveness, his murky sense of logic and the way he’d decide on one thing then change his mind literally the next page (over and over and over again) was…..oh so tiring. Overall, his state of change was too abrubt to be believable and very, you guessed it, inconsistent. Yet another problem I had was Amari’s unnecessary chapters. She spends the vast majority of the book accompanying Zélie, therefore making her chapters so painfully repetitive. The two narrating characters were restating their motivations and rehashing events that happened just pages before. I love multi-perspective fantasy books but a multiple narrators technique only works well when characters are in different places or doing very different things and TELLING US DIFFERENT THINGS. And last but not least, the ending. I mean, what was that? Obviously I can’t go into details so as not to spoil anything but I was extremely aggravated at the events leading to the ending. It felt like certain things that a certain character did were so irritatingly and utterly dumb and completely out of left field that you could tell from a mile away that it was only there for shock value and no other reason at all. I wish there were better and more clever ways to end the book. All in all... honestly, I don’t even know. I’m no stranger to failed expectations when it comes to overly hyped books but this particular disappointment... still stings. Hard. Buddy read with Yusra💓

  11. 4 out of 5

    Em (RunawayWithDreamthieves)

    I didn't really like this book but no matter, it has served its purpose which was introducing me to Amari so thanks for that I guess it wasn't a bad book, I am just a horrible hollow kind of indifferent towards it. my heart was itching for an experience that I just didn't get.

  12. 4 out of 5

    C.G. Drews

    Children of Blood And Bone is such a rich and excellently built fantasy world my opinion is just: WOW. I also feel like this book is most definitely mega-hyped but worth it, ohhh so worth it. The writing is stunning, but we just need to all sit down in a bucket and admire the world building. And the characters go from headstrong-little-stubborn-darlings-making-bad-decisions to headstrong-little-stubborn-darlings-making-bad-decisions-BUT-WITH-MAGIC-AND-EMOTIONS which is excellent development. So t Children of Blood And Bone is such a rich and excellently built fantasy world my opinion is just: WOW. I also feel like this book is most definitely mega-hyped but worth it, ohhh so worth it. The writing is stunning, but we just need to all sit down in a bucket and admire the world building. And the characters go from headstrong-little-stubborn-darlings-making-bad-decisions to headstrong-little-stubborn-darlings-making-bad-decisions-BUT-WITH-MAGIC-AND-EMOTIONS which is excellent development. So the world building was definitely masterpiece here for me. I always get so disgruntled when fantasies presented half-baked worlds. NOT HERE. I also think it did a great job building the world as you go instead of info-dumps. Although there are a lot of characters (and I mean, like MORE THAN 3 which is intense omg hold me) so it took me a long time to get everyone straight. But this is coming from someone who also can’t remember their siblings names. So. It actually has 3 POVs! We have Zélie, Amari, and Inan…and then are FABULOUS. Zélie is the headstrong magical child who was my absolute FAVOURITE for her character development, badassery, and raw emotion. Amari is the naive princess who ends up being super fierce. (Also she and Zélie fight a LOT because they’re enemies at the beginning…BUT THEN THEIR FRIENDSHIP IS SO POWERFUL AND EXCELLENT.) And Inan is the misguided prince who spends the whole book being an ass but then I felt bad for him. SO. INAN. And the plot is all action and finding magical objects and running for your freaking life. As it should be in a fantasy. Basically these troubled threesome (along with Zélie’s brother Tzain) are trying to bring magic back but they’re also messy teens who make mistakes and I loved watching them grow! OTHER THINGS TO LOVE • epic female friendship that is actual goals • the ending was an absolute riot of a ride • mY heART GOT LOST WOW • character development is A+ • lots of emphasis on glorious hair which is what I’m here for • no one is ever what they seem • slightly absolute dire need for the next book has hit me Definitely one to keep your eyeballs on, people! It's a not-to-be-missed epic fantasy. (Also I'm interviewing the author and giving away a copy of the book here!!)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ojo

    Mixed feelings, this one. While it's a good book (for most YA fans), I found it far too typical, too clichéd, too predictable. The book has spawned a lot of awesome reviews. For a debut novel, Tomi Adeyemi has actually done quite well. The writing style is especially good. But then, most of the good reviews garnered by this book are from Americans and Europeans, not Africans (especially Nigerians). She has the right idea, blending Yoruba mythology with regular YA. It's a great idea, but I must s Mixed feelings, this one. While it's a good book (for most YA fans), I found it far too typical, too clichéd, too predictable. The book has spawned a lot of awesome reviews. For a debut novel, Tomi Adeyemi has actually done quite well. The writing style is especially good. But then, most of the good reviews garnered by this book are from Americans and Europeans, not Africans (especially Nigerians). She has the right idea, blending Yoruba mythology with regular YA. It's a great idea, but I must say (from a Nigerian POV), it's poorly, poorly done. I was surprised to see that the book came with a map. Being a lover of maps, I was quite excited to see how the world-building would go. Alas, it turned out terribly sub-par. She tried uswd actual places in Nigeria as setting. While it's not a totally bad idea, the way she depicted the entire thing was thoroughly unsatisfying. A walled Lagos? Snow-capped mountains in Ibadan? A floating Ilorin? Really??? And then there's the naming system. While you white folks are probably raving about the story and all, it's us Yoruba people that'll shake our heads at how our dear language was properly murdered. I felt the names were totally inappropriate. Yoruba is unlike the shallow English Language. It is a language with a lot of empahasis on semantics. Everything has a meaning. Every meaning, every name is significant. Funmilayo Forest??? Really??? How is a forest supposed to give you joy??? Forests in Yoruba mythology are dark, forbidden places, typically evil in nature. We don't use 'wood' or 'jungle' to describe them in Nigeria. It's just not appropriate. They're called 'forest' because that's the closest word in the English Language that indicate a bit of their mytho-religious significance. Adetunji Sea? Really? In short, I felt the names didn't reflect the soul of what they were meant to represent. Mines of Calabrar? That's straight from Legend of the Seeker. She could've simply said Calabar. When Calabar is discussed, what comes to mind is the beautiful women and the delicious food. I don't think there are any mines in Calabar. Perhaps, a floating Calabar would've been more appropriate instead of a floating Ilorin. The summary is that I felt Tomi tried to compress African setting and mytho-religion into the narrow confines of American YA. While the writing and the storyline are quite good, it's the world-building that's the problem. I'd score it a big zero and I'm sure any Nigerian who comes across this will definitely feel the same. The book appeals to white folk because it's written to resemble American YA. The gods and goddesses of Yoruba traditional religion are not as nice, not as approachable and certainly darker. The use of the Yoruba language in the books is pretty much unsatisfactory. Incantations are certainly not that literal. Real incantations are composed of a complex kind of poetry in mostly archaic Yoruba, a lot of figurative meanings, allusions and other indirect literary devices. It's not a bad book altogether though. But it's not 100% African. It's a supposedly African book that closely mirrors American YA. Maybe 5% African. The soul of the entire thing is certainly not African, and definitely not Yoruba. If you're looking for an enjoyable YA read with sweet characters, then this book is for you. But if you're Nigerian and you're hoping to find something of our culture in this, chances are you'd be disappointed. I'm focusing on the poorer side of this read because I'm Yoruba, and I was excited to see some proper employment of Yoruba mythology in fantasy writing. Hopefully the next book in the series will come with big improvements in the world-building because I'm certainly going to read it. Thumbs up to the author nonetheless.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Catriona (LittleBookOwl)

    Full review to come! In the meantime - THIS WAS AMAZING. Each of the characters goes on their own intriguing journeys throughout the story, and I enjoyed going along for the ride so much. The setting, magic, and characters were so vibrant and full of life. I need the sequel, and I don't know what to do without it D: Review copy provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea Humphrey

    "We are all children of blood and bone. All instruments of vengeance and virtue." *Insert standing ovation here. Wow. This was incredible! I'm always cautious going into a hyped book because you never know what you're going to get. I've arrived at the point in my reading experience where I'm feeling a bit "been there, done that" with YA fantasy. Not to say I don't enjoy it, but up until now, it's been a hot minute since I've found a truly unique setting and cast that's blown me away. I'm a white "We are all children of blood and bone. All instruments of vengeance and virtue." *Insert standing ovation here. Wow. This was incredible! I'm always cautious going into a hyped book because you never know what you're going to get. I've arrived at the point in my reading experience where I'm feeling a bit "been there, done that" with YA fantasy. Not to say I don't enjoy it, but up until now, it's been a hot minute since I've found a truly unique setting and cast that's blown me away. I'm a white female who is tired of only reading about other white males and females who are beautiful beyond all compare, yet have the poorest self esteem, even in the midst of a love triangle, or worse, being the object of every single person's affection. I'm not saying that this is the only YA fantasy to feature people of color, but they still makes up only a small percentage of the mainstream fiction being pushed by major publishers today. What a refreshing, energizing, and exciting time it is to see a masterpiece like Children Of Blood And Bone getting the recognition it so richly deserves! I truly believe these own voices belonging to POC are paving the way for the floodgates to open to a new wave of diverse mainstream fiction. So.... How much can I say about this book? Obviously I don't want to spoil a single portion for any reader, so maybe I'll stick to the writing and emotion more than specific plot points. One of my favorite things in the world is to buddy read books with Leigh Kramer; whether we enjoy the book or not, there's always stimulating conversation and deep thought added to the experience that I wouldn't come across on my own. Both of us had been dying to pick this up and knew it had to be our next partner read and I'm not sure we'll find another book that hit us equally well! Maybe the sequel? Anyway, what started as a careful study of the setting and characters quickly turned into a full blown "manic turning of pages marathon". I'm also glad I held off on writing this review until having my final discussions with Leigh, because she brought to light a few points I hadn't even thought of up until that moment. The atmosphere is so rich here that you can practically taste it. No matter where our characters traveled to, I had a sensory experience. I could smell the moisture in the jungle air, I could taste the ash on my tongue when villages were burned, and I could hear the crunching of leaves underfoot right before an ambush was to occur. The writing was of such high quality in every aspect; the characters were unique and developed, the action scenes were tense and heart pounding, and the emotional moments were deeply felt by all. The best way I know how to sum up just what this book meant to me is this: Children Of Blood And Bone felt like a story so great that I was unworthy of reading it, but the author writes in such a genuine and inclusive manner that it's like she grabbed me around the shoulder and said "Come on in, you're welcome in my world". It's difficult to put into words just how important this book is. Sure, you can write it off and say "It's just YA fantasy", but it was so much more than that. This was an allegory of the lifetime of struggles, pain, and oppression that POC have experienced in exchange for simply breathing, something my privilege hasn't allowed me to experience. I'm just so grateful that Tomi Adeyemi was able to put pen to paper and share this struggle in a way that people of any race could learn about. If you haven't read this one yet and choose to do so, be sure to read the author's note and acknowledgements afterward; I dare you not to cry. To say I'm eagerly anticipating the sequel would be the largest understatement of the year, but there it is. Also, I'm in love with Roen but I guess Leigh can marry him since I'm not on the market.

  16. 5 out of 5

    destiny ♎ [howling libraries]

    This review has been in the works for a little too, but that’s because it’s a tough title for me to review. I originally received this as an eARC earlier in the year, and made it to about the 40% mark before DNFing it a few weeks before its release. I had already pre-ordered it and wanted to try it again, so I grabbed my finished copy off the shelf in May and read the rest of it over the span of a few days. “Courage does not always roar. Valor does not always shine.” Sometimes, when I set a bo This review has been in the works for a little too, but that’s because it’s a tough title for me to review. I originally received this as an eARC earlier in the year, and made it to about the 40% mark before DNFing it a few weeks before its release. I had already pre-ordered it and wanted to try it again, so I grabbed my finished copy off the shelf in May and read the rest of it over the span of a few days. “Courage does not always roar. Valor does not always shine.” Sometimes, when I set a book aside and come back to it, it’s because I just wasn’t in the right mood—other times, there was never going to be a ‘right mood’ for that particular read, and that’s what happened with this one. I really thought this would be one of my top reads of the year, so you can imagine how difficult it is for me to say that I think it suffered from quite a bit of over-hyping. “I teach you to be warriors in the garden so you will never be gardeners in the war.” It felt pretty predictable for the most part, a solid 150-200 pages of it was very boring to me, and most of the characters weren’t enjoyable to read about because they just didn’t feel fleshed out. Zélie was likable, if a bit simplistic, but I think the only character I genuinely enjoyed was Amari; she undergoes a tremendous amount of character growth in a very short span of time, and was honestly the unsung hero of this novel. “We fought. We persevered. We rose.” Also, please don’t even get me started on the forced romance in this story. This entire novel would have benefited tremendously from being romance-free, but instead we got this very awkward, uncomfortable pairing that I saw coming from the first page and found myself cringing, waiting for it to happen, until it finally did. When I, as a huge lover of romance in stories, literally end up skim reading entire pages of romantic development, there’s a problem. “You crushed us to build your monarchy on the backs of our blood and bone. Your mistake wasn’t keeping us alive. It was thinking we’d never fight back.” Of course, it’s not all bad; I know I sound negative and I don’t mean to, because Children of Blood and Bone has a lot of positivity to bring to the table, too. It’s so incredible to see a fantasy novel by a black author, with a cast entirely comprised of black characters, and to know that so much of it is inspired by the author’s own heritage (though I am dismayed to have seen several own-voice reviews calling the Nigerian representation flawed). I adore the author as a human being and think she is a delight, and I’m ecstatic to know that she’s already gotten such a killer movie deal for this story. Will I rush to continue the series? Hard to say. Will I be in the movie theatres supporting the hell out of this adaptation, though? Absolutely! Also, despite my lack of being impressed by the writing itself overall, if you enjoy fantasy stories, I still strongly recommend picking this up—especially if you aren’t as cynical of a reader as I tend to be—because this book has an audience and deserves to be given a chance. Thank you so much to Henry Holt Books for Young Readers for providing me with this ARC in exchange for an honest review! You can find this review and more on my blog, or you can follow me on twitter, bookstagram, or facebook!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Warda

    PSA FOR TODAY. THIS BOOK IS OUT NOW!! Do your shelves and soul a favour is all I'm saying. You're welcome. -------------------------------------- [4.5 stars] Thank you Macmillan Books for this arc. Honestly, I don't know how to review this book. My emotions are everywhere at the moment and as much as I wanted to write something comprehensive, I doubt that'll happen. Like the author has stated, this is a story inspired by her West-African heritage, which seeps through the writing and the world and the PSA FOR TODAY. THIS BOOK IS OUT NOW!! Do your shelves and soul a favour is all I'm saying. You're welcome. -------------------------------------- [4.5 stars] Thank you Macmillan Books for this arc. Honestly, I don't know how to review this book. My emotions are everywhere at the moment and as much as I wanted to write something comprehensive, I doubt that'll happen. Like the author has stated, this is a story inspired by her West-African heritage, which seeps through the writing and the world and the atmosphere she creates. It's an all black cast of characters. All black. Let's take a moment. It's rare, if ever barely seen. And even if it's out there, those stories do not get the same type of exposure as books with an all-white cast of characters. And the fact that this book was an insight into her world and that it is so hyped now, makes me so goddamn elated. I absolutely LOVED that aspect and that it was a fantasy novel as well. It was a shock in the best way possible. Since it did surprise me, I reflected on myself and the books that I've read since I was a child. I think it goes to show how I, as a reader, have become accustomed to seeing white characters, the white narrative to the point where if characters of different backgrounds are included, it stands out and is notable. I hope for the day diversity becomes the norm in novels and is celebrated in our world. Thankfully, the publishing world is slowly changing as well. Books like these absolutely need to be supported and published more and become more accessible to readers, especially in this current climate, where empathy should be a more common trait. Books like these expose us to other worlds, other faiths and races, general differences that exist within us, and reinforces the idea that difference is good. Difference is what this world is about and what should be accepted, without any qualms. As for the story, it is heavily political, focusing on themes of class, race, oppression, privilege and police brutality and she does not shy away from violence. I love that Adeyemi did that; write a YA fantasy novel that looks at our modern reality and infuse those issues in a story, giving readers a glimpse into the reality of being black or a minority. The magic was fantastic and ridiculously fascinating. Rather than expanding on it, I'll leave it out for you to find out. It is gorgeous. The plot was deliciously fast-paced and had me on the edge of my seat, especially towards the end of the book. I was excited to pick the book up each time I put it down. It was an avalanche-style-Sanderson ending, which was so glorious to read. And the characters!!! So. Damn. Good! *weeps* I want to go back and read this book again! I'm so excited to see how this story will develop. Bring on book 2! ASAP please! --------------------------------- Initial review! Well, damn those last 100 pages or so were literally explosive. SUCH A GOOD ENDING I NEED MORE!! 😍 RTC but just buy this book already. The hype is real and justified.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Claudia Ramírez

    4.5 stars!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sana

    This is a 500+ page book which I devoured in 2 days. I'm so surprised by how fast I finished this. This was such a good ASS book. I was 100% invested in it and found it impossible to put down whenever I was reading. This book is fucking amazing and deserves all the hype it's getting!! I found myself getting attached to these characters so quick and literally on the edge of my seat because everything is so action packed and intense and death can happen to anyone at any fucking time in this book j This is a 500+ page book which I devoured in 2 days. I'm so surprised by how fast I finished this. This was such a good ASS book. I was 100% invested in it and found it impossible to put down whenever I was reading. This book is fucking amazing and deserves all the hype it's getting!! I found myself getting attached to these characters so quick and literally on the edge of my seat because everything is so action packed and intense and death can happen to anyone at any fucking time in this book jfc. ◇PLOT Orïsha was once a land where magic used to thrive and be respected, but now magic is considered dangerous and is absolutely forbidden. Zélie, a Divîner like her mother and many others, now lives under oppression and fear of the ruthless King Saran. When a powerful scroll is found, the Divîners have hope that magic can be bought back to the land of Orïsha for good. Zélie with the help of some people, is destined to find the other powerful artifacts and bring magic back. ◇WRITING AND WORLD BUILDING This is such a beautifully written book and I'm in love with so many of the powerful quotes from this book. Though this is a fantasy novel, the society in this world is very similar to ours. Every character in this book is black. Dark skinned people in this book are treated so horribly and called nasty slurs every day, while the lighter skinned people (including the royals) will do anything to stay light. They don't go out because then they'll be exposed to the sun which will make them darker and even go as far as putting powder on themselves to stay light. It shows the every day racism dark skinned people go through. I LOVED reading about West African culture. Their customs, tradition, language, food, religion and festivals were so beautiful and interesting to read about. I was fucking heart eyes at the writing throughout the entire book. Also, this book is so brutal and ruthless. There is violence like, literally everywhere. A lot of blood is spilled. People are always FUCKING DYING. The Divîners are treated very horribly. There's a lot of gore, so please keep this in mind if these types of things bother you. I, personally, loved it. ◇CHARACTERS ※Zélie is character who annoyed me a lot throughout the book, but I still really liked her character. What I love about her is that she's not a perfect Mary Sue and accepts her fear of messing up, but she made some terrible choices that got her into so much trouble. This girl is deadass told a thousand times to not fuck up AND SHE DOES. She gets so many people killed and puts her family in so much danger. I literally wanted to scream at her to just fucking listen to Tzain and not attract attention. I feel really meh towards her. I don't hate her, but I really don't care if she dies either, you know what I mean? Lmao. ※Princess Amara is a fucking goddess and I would kiss the very ground she walks on. What a fucking queen, I would DIE FOR HER. Unlike her brutal father who hates magic and the Divîners, she sympathizes with them and wants to bring a change to Orïsha. She's such a sweet and kind character. She's just..... so soft, precious and innocent. I want to protect her from every bad thing on this planet and give her cookies or something. She's always expected to be a perfect lady at the palace and considered weak by her father for not being able to being herself to strike someone with a sword. And at the end, she's a fucking Lioness. She goes through so much and is able to defend and find her strength, while remaining kind and loving. Alkdskjsvbqdgq, I fucking love Amari. "Duty before self." ※Inan is Amari's brother and the crown prince. He is constantly torn between right and wrong: to stand for equality and peace or continue his fathers extermination of magic? He is always pressured to please his father and do what it best for his kingdom, sacrificing anything and everything if it means good for his kingdom. I really felt heartbroken over what he was going through and just wanted to give this poor kid a smoothie or somethin'. ※Tzain is Zélie's brother and one of the best characters in this book. He's so clever, loving and precious. His relationship with Zélie is so perfect and adorable. He's always watching out for her and wants to protect her from harm. I love how, when he fell in lurvveee, he didn't fall for the "I'LL IGNORE MY ENTIRE FUCKING FAMILY OR DRIFT AWAY FROM THEM AND DROOL AFTER MY GIRLFRIEND" trope. He always has Zélie's back. I love him. These four characters are the main characters and they all have POV's except for Tzain. I really hope we get a POV from him in the next books because I really love him!!! ※The shittiest parent award goes toooooooooooooooooooooooooo King Saran!!!!! DING DING DING. What piece of fucking shit, this dude oh my god. I fucking hate him. He's a horrible parent and leader and whenever he popped up, I hoped he died. He's so cruel, even to his own family and just an absolute shithead. Fuck this guy. Overall, this book is fantastic and important. I loved it from beginning to end and was so surprised by how much I loved it. Definitely one of my favorite books of 2018. I can't wait for the other books in the trilogy to be released. This ending was absolute hell. —————— This book thicc but I know it's going to be worth it because all black characters???? about west African culture??? This is going to be EPIC. Buddy read with the gang: Rae, Nadhira, Danielle, and Scrill

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sabrina The Trash Queen

    ”With the right blow I could knock him off his feet; with the right thrust I could crush his throat.” I’m speechless 😶! This book was everything that I was hoping for and more. The writing is brilliant and beautiful, the story is magnificent, the magic is so unique and the characters are THE BEST PART OF THE BOOK. At the same time, they are very alike, they are very different. All of them have different reasons to fight but they are fighting for the same thing, PEACE. All of the characters at the ”With the right blow I could knock him off his feet; with the right thrust I could crush his throat.” I’m speechless 😶! This book was everything that I was hoping for and more. The writing is brilliant and beautiful, the story is magnificent, the magic is so unique and the characters are THE BEST PART OF THE BOOK. At the same time, they are very alike, they are very different. All of them have different reasons to fight but they are fighting for the same thing, PEACE. All of the characters at the same time are strong yet feel more them they should, they fight for something worth it of death in the way. The relationship between Zélie and Tzain and Amari is so good!!!! The interaction between them is so fun and amazing!!! They are so strong and badass. I love them so much💖. “Taunting. Tainting. Kill her, I remind myself. I’ll kill the girl. I’ll kill this curse. If I can’t— I force a deep breath. If I can’t, I’m already dead.” Inan, I hated you so much at the start and I wanted to keep hating you, oh how I did but one thing let to another and I end up caring for you at the end. He’s such a tortured soul. They all are, to be honest. The development the characters had, to become what they needed to, is beautiful and realistic. It was a slow process, but such a good one. I liked almost all of the side characters, except the ridiculous and freaking unnecessary King, he can burn and burn. “Do not worry,” I whisper as he takes his last breath. “I will make a far better queen.” There here so many badass moments in this book, holy damn if I didn’t love it!!! I lived for the funny moments in this book, because to much happen and I needed a break to be able to catch my breath. “I can almost hear it in my head.” “What’s it saying?” I ask. “It’s a horn, Amari. It’s not saying anything.” My cheeks flush. “Well, if it’s a sculpture, it shouldn’t be making sounds at all!” That end, I can’t. I need the sequel at this exact moment. I need answers!.!.!.! BR with Zoë💘

  21. 5 out of 5

    Yusra ✨

    UNPOPULAR OPINION ALERT!!!!! I think 99% of my friends loved this book, and trust me. I wanted to love it, too. The diverse cast of characters, a land of magic, themes of revenge, and fantasy all gripped me. I thought I was going to love Zélie and her badass nature, and that there was going to be all the elements of a wonderful fantasy book. I thought I would find a new favourite. mild spoilers ahead, major are marked. That’s not to say this book was horrible . There were definitely some positi UNPOPULAR OPINION ALERT!!!!! I think 99% of my friends loved this book, and trust me. I wanted to love it, too. The diverse cast of characters, a land of magic, themes of revenge, and fantasy all gripped me. I thought I was going to love Zélie and her badass nature, and that there was going to be all the elements of a wonderful fantasy book. I thought I would find a new favourite. mild spoilers ahead, major are marked. That’s not to say this book was horrible . There were definitely some positives, and I will be picking up the sequel. It’s just that my expectations were so high and… in the end, I was just so disappointed. like....Kobe Bryant and Usher have read this book. MICHAEL B JORDAN HIMSELF DM'ED THE AUTHOR ABOUT THIS BOOK. That’s like… insane, considering it’s YA. I have nothing but respect for Adeyemi, though, because she's such a queen for bringing a POC cast, and she's getting so much positive feedback for it! The story follows Zélie, a divîner in Ilorin who is training in secret with Mama Agba. Alongside her fellow divîners, she learns to fight while the threat of guards is forever lurking. Although all divîners are supposed to grow into powerful maji later in life, King Saran led an attack on all maji that destroyed magic, killing thousands, including Zélie’s mother. When fate entwines her with Princess Amari, the very daughter of the king who stole her people's magic, she sets off on a journey to restore it once and for all. (why do YA heroines always think this will be so easy ????) ZÉLIE I was looking for a Lada Dracul 2.0. I found… not a Lada Dracul 2.0. Zélie was one of the most immature, stupid characters I’ve ever read about. You know those characters that you scream at in your head? That make you want to physically throw the book against the wall? She was the main reason why I disliked this book so much. She consistently made horrible decisions, and it was always others that had to pay for her utter lack of logic. I’m just going to insert one of many quotes that her brother says to her after she makes a stupid decision; “You’re always screwing things up. Why stop now?” Yeah, he sums it up pretty well. Honestly, I just think I failed to connect with the character itself. I could care less what happened to her. Yes, during her (view spoiler)[ torture (hide spoiler)] it was hard not to feel bad about her constant flashbacks and what happened to her; but it wasn’t because of her , specifically. Rather, it was the general theme and connection to the Black Lives Matter movement. I hated how entitled she felt. Yes, I know, she spent half of the book just saying how she wasn’t “strong” or “ready” enough to lead the ritual to restore magic, so I wouldn’t say she’s full of herself. But there comes a time when she has a chance to turn some of the divîners she meets into maji, and she doesn’t want to . She thinks it’ll cause chaos and destruction in the world, because the divîners won’t know what to do with their newfound magic. uhhh I’m sorry? Who gave you the right to decide who should have magic and who shouldn’t? I found it so shallow and outright wrong for her to be the only one with these wonderful powers, when she herself knows she’s not the best candidate for the job. All in all… there was nothing to love about her. I’m so sorry, but I don’t know where all the love for her is coming from. AMARI I’ll be honest, Nani knows that I spent most of this book jumping from either hating Zélie and liking Amari, and then vice versa. Primarily near the end though, Amari really pulled through as a character. The progression and character buildup wasn’t there, but something about her nature was endearing. or maybeee I just liked her more because in contrast to Zelie, she's pretty great. Initially, she was the type of character that you yell at: “omg can you stop being annoying and KILL THE GUY” (we all know what boat scene I’m talking about, yes, yes?) and I just didn’t understand where her sudden ferocity came from. Also, her connection with Binta seemed really dark. As in, it was a show-not-tell relationship that I didn’t feel that much for. Your typical "princess turned rebel", but if Tzain likes her, I like her. INAN Duty before self. Duty before self. Duty before self. okay honey, I get it. Seriously, the amount of times he said that was just… annoying. In the beginning, his POV was the most interesting to read about. The struggles he had within himself and the discoveries he made were intriguing and one of the best parts of the book. Until… he met Zélie. That’s when his changes became abrupt and came out of no context. (view spoiler)[ like what was that ending? it made no sense why he want haywire?? he better stay dead (hide spoiler)] just another character I ended up… hating. LIKE WHY I'M STILL SO CONFUSED ABOUT HIM TZAIN Oh, the shining light at the end of this tunnel. A whole 1.5 stars that I gave to this book are only for him. I knew I’d love him right from the beginning when he started calling out Zélie’s bullshit faster than I could say “MARRYME”. While mostly everything else in this book was irrational, Tzain was logical. Hate to throw this cliché saying your way, but, he “looked before he leapt”. Unlike his crazy, childish sister. I don’t know where her genes came from. Tzain was such a sweetheart from the beginning. I was gushing @ him and Amari, even when he wasn’t in straight-up love with her and was just a normal, caring individual. So much love for him. I’ll be reading book 2 solely for him. let me just hit you with a couple of heart emojis to display my endless love for him. 💗💗💗💗💗💗💞💞💞💞💞💞💘💘💘💘💘💓💓💓💓💓💕💕💕💕💕 things to love ~ As I mentioned, the diversity !! when’s the last time you’ve read a book with an all-black cast? I don’t even think I have. It was something so special and wonderful and by an #ownvoices author, and that made this book much better. ~ world-building was okay, not the best but definitely not the worst. I did feel the magical and fantastical atmosphere ~ the cover is so much more beautiful in real life, let me tell you. I was wary about it when ordering but IT’S SO PRETTY. the book in general is really pretty as well. ~ god, that author’s note. I finished reading this at 4am (all you suhoor people know why I was awake at that time) and the note almost made me cry. but you know #gottasavethosefluids. anyways, I don’t think I really took the Black Lives Matter movement into context when I was reading, but understanding that’s what Tomi Adeyemi was trying to get across broke my heart. It made me appreciate the book a lot more, despite the fact that it was still… a two star read. It made me wish like nothing else that my feelings towards the book would change, but here I am. unchanged. but definitely not unmoved. ~ Roën has the Kaz Brekker vibes I love and adore. Seriously, I think I’m in love. If he’s a potential love interest I’m saying yes a million times. ~ I’ll just say it again for the people in the back : TZAIN TZAIN TZAIN TZAIN what I…. didn’t love ~ instalove was so present. it really, really annoyed me. Zélie defends the boy like she’s known him since she was in the womb. They had no chemistry, no connection whatsoever. It’s like Zélie forgets who he is, just because of the one moment she keeps replaying in her head … of him carrying her. goddamn girl have you never been touched by a male? Is this the issue here? enemies to lover trope done alllll wrong. when you have a character as stupid as Zélie, it’s hard to do it right. ~ everything seemed… easy. I don’t know how to explain it. I wasn’t ever excited or worried or intrigued or enticed. It seemed as though there was always a solution present for our wonderful protagonists. ~ the ending was… one of the worst I’ve read. it was like here! let me throw this in your face! (view spoiler)[ no seriously where did Baba come from (hide spoiler)] I’m left with unanswered questions that I’d rather not get the answers for. ~ it begs the question…. why Zélie? what was so special about her? it can't be her amazing, smart personality can it??? ~ pacing was sometimes slow, sometimes fast, and always not working for me. I mean, there wasn’t ever a time when I was dying of boredom, but I know it’s not going to work for some people. ~ in the words of Nani, “‘here. Elemental magic. And done. That’s it.” couldn’t have said it better. ~ pretty much a lot of things. there were little nitpicks that got under my skin. like for example: we have this thirteen year old girl that is apparently extremely old for her age and is also the leader of a group of divîners, but she starts jumping up and down like a lunatic when she’s excited. I’m sorry? I was thirteen once too and… that’s not how I remember acting. there were a couple of other things as well, but they've completely left my mind right now. ~ here’s another important side note: don’t lower your standards people. I was so happy for this to be a diverse book, but that doesn’t mean I’m going to lie and say I loved it solely because of that. I mean, it was an aspect that I loved, but the other things brought down my rating considerably. I just want to say though, I love Tomi Adeyemi so much. I follow her on Instagram, Twitter and just admire her so much as a person. So it really breaks my heart to not love her books, but you know… (let me hit you with another cheesy saying) maybe the best is yet to come! (ps. I love Tzain) ——— this was a buddy read with Nani ✨

  22. 5 out of 5

    Korrina (OwlCrate)

    It took me awhile to get through this book (due to the fact that it’s quite long, and is a very detailed and involved fantasy world), but I highly enjoyed it. I absolutely adored the magic system in this story, and loved the visuals I imagined while reading. I really do hope this becomes a movie on the big screen, because it would be so epic!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Christian

    It doesn't happen too often that I actually, really dislike a book. And I still can't really express how sad I am about the fact that it had to happen with this one. Initially, I was wary about Children of Blood and Bone. Apart from the West-African mythology aspect, it didn't sound like it was bringing anything new to the table, and as someone who primarily reads fantasy, it's pretty hard at this point to find a truly unique story. But when more and more over-the-moon, positive reviews came flo It doesn't happen too often that I actually, really dislike a book. And I still can't really express how sad I am about the fact that it had to happen with this one. Initially, I was wary about Children of Blood and Bone. Apart from the West-African mythology aspect, it didn't sound like it was bringing anything new to the table, and as someone who primarily reads fantasy, it's pretty hard at this point to find a truly unique story. But when more and more over-the-moon, positive reviews came flooding in, I suddenly got immensely excited to pick it up myself and see what the hype is about, so excited that, in truth, I was expecting to have a new favorite on my hands. Well - I was wrong. The book started out very promising, with certain elements that are probably the only redeeming qualities for me. For one, the whole concept of the magical system with its different clans and the horrific oppression of an entire group of people was, in itself, not necessarily new, but due to the mythology influences, everything had such a fresh glow, and ultimately, even though it fell flat for me, I cannot put into words how happy it makes me that this high fantasy novel full of POC exists and is loved by such a broad audience. Apart from that, I also enjoyed some of the more complex questions that Zélie and her companions had to try to answer. For instance, even though she starts out being all for the restoration of magic, throughout the journey she comes across obstacles that make her resolve crumble a little, that make her doubt that there is any peace to ultimately come from it. Whereas the entire plan felt a bit one-dimensional in the beginning, it was suddenly not so easy to tell right from wrong, and if you know me, you also know that I love dubious morality and somewhat... gray areas in terms of good and bad. To me, everything started going downhill somewhere around the 200 pages mark. I suddenly noticed that I felt pretty disconnected from the characters (who I initially liked) and their entire adventure, because everything was just way too fast-paced for me to actually develop an emotional connection to... well, anything, really. Something was constantly happening, but it was always over so fast that I could barely figure out how I felt about what characters did or what changed their attitude toward something. *narrator voice* And then everything went up in flames. Because, oh boy, the romance. THE ROMANCE. tHe RoMaNcE?? It doesn't even deserve to be called that. You see, I think what disappoints me the most is that I see so much potential. SO much. This could have easily been one of the most epic novels I've ever read. The same thing goes for the romance. Because apart from Zélie and runaway princess Amari (who is like, the only character I genuinely like, she had such a pure character development and is just my favorite), we also follow Amari's brother Inan, who believes a lot more into his father's gruesome ways than Amari does. As the former two set out to restore magic, he decides to chase them in order to keep their plan from succeeding, which, to him, should be accomplished by killing Zélie. (Who also happens to know that Inan himself is starting to develop some magical abilities, which he's desperately trying to keep a secret, since his father would kill him on sight if he found out, so ya know, being daddy's boy and all, he really wants her dead.) I was HERE FOR IT. Because if you know me even better, then you also know that I am head over heels for the enemies-to-lovers trope, if it's well done. And the emphasis here is definitely on that last part. Because whereas I was imagining their mutual hatred (Zélie wasn't too big a fan of Inan's plan to kill her and generally him being the son of the monster who killed an entire people, basically) to maybe slowly turn into something else in, I don't know, book 2, I did not get that by any means. Instead, it took about two days of them working together (to save Zélie's brother and Inan's sister) for both of them to suddenly say things like this: "We only need each other." "Two days without her. In her absence, the ocean air hangs heavy. Every breath whispers her name." I had question marks all over my face. And it didn't stop there. No. Because a day later, they come up with this beautiful plan to be together forever and revolutionize Orïsha as a power couple. It was one of the worst cases of insta-love I've ever read, worse still due to the fact that they literally wanted to wear each other's guts as necklaces about ten pages before. Over the next... 200 pages... I was (I'm coining this term) in eye-rolling-hell. I was hoping for the focus to slowly move away from their "relationship" once they were separated again (or for one to murder the other as a plot twist, I really just wanted them to die), but nope, all they could think about was each other for the rest of the book. (view spoiler)[At one point Zélie is captured and tortured to her breaking point, and after being rescued, the first thing she does is have dream-sex with Inan. I screamed. (Inan's ability is to manipulate thoughts and dreams, essentially.) (hide spoiler)] It was suck a freaking trainwreck. I considered dnf'ing the book multiple times, and I've never just stopped reading a book before. It was such a struggle to pick it back up every single time. I really just wanted it to end. To top everything off, the ending was - of course - kind of cool, and I feel so cheated by it getting interesting and surprising on the last two pages, especially because I will not do another 500 pages of annoyance to myself a second time. I know that Amari is just gonna keep getting cooler exponentially and that she'll save the entire land one day, but I won't stick around to find out. Now that that's off my chest, I'd like to forget I ever read this so I can go back to it being all epic and breathtaking in my mind. I'm glad everyone loves this book so much, and I bet you're going to get a nice sequel, but personally, I'll just slowly leave this meeting and pretend like all this never happened.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ben Alderson

    All you need to know from this review is.... Read the book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cait • A Page with a View

    Uhh wow yes this was amazing. Full review to come!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte May

    3.75 stars ⭐ “On Earth, Sky Mother creates humans, her children of blood and bone.” This had such a strong start! A world where magic no longer exists, and anyone with heritage relating to those who wielded magic (magi) were beaten, and treated awfully by the nobles. Usually given away by their bold white hair. Zelie is one such girl, living with her Baba and brother Tzain after their mother was taken and killed during ‘the raid’ the time magic was taken away for good. When in the marketplace s 3.75 stars ⭐️ “On Earth, Sky Mother creates humans, her children of blood and bone.” This had such a strong start! A world where magic no longer exists, and anyone with heritage relating to those who wielded magic (magi) were beaten, and treated awfully by the nobles. Usually given away by their bold white hair. Zelie is one such girl, living with her Baba and brother Tzain after their mother was taken and killed during ‘the raid’ the time magic was taken away for good. When in the marketplace she gets caught up in some trouble with another girl and they flee. Turns out this girl is the Princess Amari, escaping from the palace after her servant and best friend was killed due to her heritage. After Zelie’s home is destroyed, the three of them run away. And so begins a perilous tale where they seek to bring magic back to the Magi, so they can finally defend themselves from those who would seek them harm. A great cast of characters, Zelie and her brother Tzain. Amari struggling with the horrors her father the King has inflicted, and those her brother Inan is also causing. I loved the mythology and the magic system. All of this was great - I grew less impressed with the 2 romances just thrown in (but then I’m not a romance fan at all) both this and the ending kept it from four stars. The ending was an absolute bloodbath. So many deaths in such a short amount of pages! I’m not sensitive when it comes to killings (I’ve read all A Song of Ice and Fire) But to me it just seemed too much all at once. Serious cliffhanger ending as well so I will be holding out for the next book. 😊 “As long as we don’t have magic, they will never treat us with respect... They need to know we can hit them back. If they burn our homes, we burn theirs, too.”

  27. 5 out of 5

    jessica

    ‘you may kill me with your hatefulness, but still, like air, i rise.’ - maya angelou this poem was literally all i could think about whilst reading this book, and both are so important. from a cultural standpoint, i thought this book was brilliant. the diversity and representation is what gave this book its power. and although i wasnt as obsessed with the plot and characters as the rest of the universe seems to be, i still found this to be a pretty good story. i thought inan was a high point - his ‘you may kill me with your hatefulness, but still, like air, i rise.’ - maya angelou this poem was literally all i could think about whilst reading this book, and both are so important. from a cultural standpoint, i thought this book was brilliant. the diversity and representation is what gave this book its power. and although i wasnt as obsessed with the plot and characters as the rest of the universe seems to be, i still found this to be a pretty good story. i thought inan was a high point - his growth and journey towards acceptance was quite lovely to read. the only thing that really bothered me was the ending, as i cant stand cliffhangers. i wish there had been more of a conclusion, but overall, i was very pleased with this impressive debut! 4 stars

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dana Kenedy (Dana and the Books)

    I'm running a giveaway for Children of Blood and Bone! Ends April 22 and open internationally - Enter here! This review can also be found on my blog, Dana and the Books Children of Blood and Bone has been on my book radar for MONTHS. Every corner of the bookish internet was praising it and shouting about how great it is. And you know what? It's worth every ounce of hype it's received. It's one of those wonderful cases where the inside of the book is just as gorgeous as the outside! Seriously. I w I'm running a giveaway for Children of Blood and Bone! Ends April 22 and open internationally - Enter here! This review can also be found on my blog, Dana and the Books Children of Blood and Bone has been on my book radar for MONTHS. Every corner of the bookish internet was praising it and shouting about how great it is. And you know what? It's worth every ounce of hype it's received. It's one of those wonderful cases where the inside of the book is just as gorgeous as the outside! Seriously. I was hooked from just the first chapter. Her African inspired fantasy world is so detailed, her characters so rich; the world building and character development in just the first couple chapters was so well crafted. It was so subtle, but so engaging and not once did it feel like an info dump. I can see why the movie rights were snatched up well before the book was even released. The book alternated between the point of view of three characters. Usually when there's multiple POVs there's always that one character whose chapters you have to force yourself to get through, but not in Children of Blood and Bone. Each character is integral to the plot progression and each character has their own unique story to add to the overall arc. Tomi is a naturally gifted writer. She created a book where you think you'll just sit down and read for ten minutes but before you know it an hour has passed, you've read a hundred pages, and you're unsure what year it is and what's real. At more than 500 pages it's on the long side for the first book in a YA fantasy series, but I could have easily read 500 more pages. Not once did it drag or slow down. It's 525 pages of "I NEED TO KNOW WHAT HAPPENS NEXT!" And it looks like everyone agrees with me since it debuted at #1 on New York Times Best Sellers List. I can see it staying at the top for many weeks to come! Do yourself a favour and read it! It lives up to the hype. Book Links: Book Depository | Amazon US | Amazon Canada | Amazon UK

  29. 4 out of 5

    ijeoma Agbaje

    A thoroughly dissappointing read. Before i dive into this review, i'd just like to say that i did like the premise of this book. I liked the fact that Tomi wanted to explore Yoruba mythology, i also absolutely loved the fact that she wanted to put Nigeria not just as a place representing Africa as a whole but a country with it's unique culture and all that - she failed in that though , but hey at least she didn't do the whole Africa is a country thing. First of: Adeyemi had a chance really to pro A thoroughly dissappointing read. Before i dive into this review, i'd just like to say that i did like the premise of this book. I liked the fact that Tomi wanted to explore Yoruba mythology, i also absolutely loved the fact that she wanted to put Nigeria not just as a place representing Africa as a whole but a country with it's unique culture and all that - she failed in that though , but hey at least she didn't do the whole Africa is a country thing. First of: Adeyemi had a chance really to properly explore yoruba mythology and you know just educate people but somewhere along the line everything started looking like a rebooted Netflix Version of your fave animie. How do you delete Olodumare, Olorun and Olofi and put Sky Mother??? Who is that? Then this Nigeria depicted in this book is so lazy. I know, i know, people might say it's fiction but Nigeria is a real ass place. The least you can if you're going to use real places and basically base the identity of your characters as Nigerians is to actually PROPERLY represent such a country. First of Nigeria is freaking huge. So when these characters were hot steping from Lagos - Ilorin - Sokoto in a matter of days i'm sorry i just couldn't roll with it. Then the weather, i mean c'mon snow in Ibadan??? Look i never saw snow until i lived outside Nigeria for 2 years. So this thing she does where she sort of uses weak token gestures to make these characters believable Nigerians is sad. I mean what is with this dashikis they were wearing? I didn't even see one mention of an Agbada or a fila or something. Now that i think about it, you're not even sure what era in Nigeria she's basing her characterisation of Nigeria on. I'm saying this because 1. she mentions Gombe State. Gombe was created in 1996 out of Bauchi State. Also, the author makes it seem like it's just Yoruba that exists in the whole of Nigeria. I find it difficult to imagine for example that people in Sokoto are going to care one hoot for a yoruba deity. Nigeria has so many tribes who i'm sure obviously have their own mythologies and the author basically saying the whole Nigeria is yoruba is just like i said, a lazy depiction of Nigeria. Then the hair. See. I've noticed authors want to write in black women/girls but never want to write them with real hair. HOW WERE ZELIE & AMARI'S HAIR BONE STRAIGHT? Did they have relaxers? Binta's hair is literally described as falling in silky sheets. I mean how??? Inan describes Zelie hair like this "White locks that once feel in smooth sheets now cascade down her back in flowing waves" Ugh!!!! Forget the mushy description. But even when her hair is going natural, Tomi Adeyemi still refuses to give her the typical hair you would find on an average Nigerian girl. I mean except she had Fulani blood in her which she clearly didn't, This hair thing was a huge fail. Could be wrong, but i honestly feel like she was pandering to her non African audience in terms of the hair & depiction of Nigeria. Which is why her characters for me almost feel like foreign Nigerians. I mean even the name of her main character is so not Yoruba. Fun fact: There's no 'z' in the yoruba alphabet so where did the name Zelie come from? Let's dive into the plot proper...Which is frankly a hot mess. The magic system is completely unexplained which i felt was delibrately done in order to carry Inan's story arc. Then blood magic?? Really if anyone knows what that was all about, feel free to explain it to me please. The constant need YA authors need to pair characters up like if that doesn't happen, the whole plot will spontaneously combust. the annoying, irritating fact that even though this author is a woman she couldn't make Zelie bad ass enough and stop being so damn emotional. We have so few bad ass female MC's and the few YA authors manage to write have their abilities forever overshadowed by falling in love with some freaking dramatic shit of a male character that cannot get his priorities right. Also whoa!!! The Avatar Last Airbender similarites were so glaring that i was unable to unsee them at every freaking point. I honestly feel the bar is basically set on the floor for YA novels, which is why someone can toss in a few yoruba words add a real African country in it for good measure, have a gaping plot hole in terms of the magic system, give a characters magic willy nilly but still have everyone go awwww because hey guess what i know i didn't tell you how it works but don't worry here's two beautiful characters falling in love don't stress yourself on how everything works. You want to know the deal with Blood magic? shhh shhhh here's two beautiful characters kissing. Miss me with this book!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Heather 'Bookables'

    4.75 Review to come! Loved it!

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